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Photo: Leigh Vogel/WireImage

The Justice Department urged the Supreme Court on Monday to take up a legal battle over the Trump administration's attempt to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, despite lower courts having yet to rule on the legality of the effort.

The big picture: The administration has been trying to bypass lower-court rulings on some of President Trump’s signature policy proposals with the hope that the now conservative Supreme Court majority will help push his measures through. 

Yes, but: The Supreme Court appears to have noticed this trend.

  • On Friday, it declined a request to block a landmark youth climate lawsuit.
  • And in February, the high court rejected a petition to consider a DACA case in California before a federal court could weigh in.

The details: The DOJ argues that by the time the lower courts rule on the issue it might be too late to get the case on the Supreme Court's 2018-2019 docket. If so, that means the administration would have to keep the Obama-era program for at least another year.

  • Meanwhile, cases in California, New York, and Washington, D.C. are challenging the legality of Trump’s attempt to undo DACA, which protects unauthorized immigrants who came to the U.S. as children from deportation.

What they're saying: New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood was quick to call out the Justice Department, tweeting that the practice is "a remarkable lack of respect for the judicial process."

  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in a statement that his agency "should not have been forced to make this filing today — the Ninth Circuit should have acted expeditiously, just as the Supreme Court expected them to do — but we will not hesitate to defend the Constitutional system of checks and balances vigorously and resolutely.”

Go deeper

Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

Containers carrying doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine arrive in Brazil. Photo: Maurio Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil on Saturday began distributing the 2 million doses of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine that arrived from India Friday, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: Brazil has the third highest COVID-19 case-count in the world, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The 2 million doses "only scratch the surface of the shortfall," Brazilian public health experts told the AP.

Sullivan speaks with Israel's national security adviser for the first time

Israeli national security adviser Meir Ben Shabbat U.S. Photo: Mazen Mahdi/Getty Images. U.S. national security adviser Jake Sullivan. Photo: Chandan Khanna/Getty Images

U.S. national security adviser Jake Sullivan spoke on the phone Saturday with his Israeli counterpart Meir Ben Shabbat, Israeli officials tell Axios.

Why it matters: This is the first contact between the Biden White House and Israeli prime minister's office. During the transition, the Biden team refrained from speaking to foreign governments.

Biden speaks to Mexican president about reversing Trump's "draconian immigration policies"

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

President Biden told his Mexican counterpart, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, on a phone call Friday that he plans to reverse former President Trump’s “draconian immigration policies.”

The big picture: The Biden administration has already started repealing several of Trump’s immigration policies, including ordering a 100-day freeze on deporting many unauthorized immigrants, halting work on the southern border wall, and reversing plans to exclude undocumented people from being included in the 2020 census.