Feb 26, 2018

SCOTUS won't review Trump's DACA appeal

Photo: Alex Wong / Getty

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected the Trump administration's appeal of an injunction that has allowed DACA recipients to renew their legal status, despite Attorney General Jeff Sessions announcing the end of the program in September.

Why it matters: The decision essentially makes the March 5th deadline meaningless, and there will be much less incentive for lawmakers to reach an agreement soon. Until a final decision on the case, which experts say isn't expected for another year, current DACA recipients will be able to continue to renew their DACA protections.

Yes, but: “Policy making through litigation is really the worst option for the government, for the Dreamers and for employers," Lynden Melmed, partner at BAL and former USCIS chief counsel told Axios. "It is very unpredictable and no one can plan ahead. There may be short-term relief for a few Dreamers but I think you’ll see companies and employees continue to push Congress to act in the months ahead.”

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Trump administration backs Oracle in Google fight

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo via The Washington Post.

The Trump administration is siding with Oracle in the database giant's dispute with Google before the Supreme Court — a move that comes as Oracle's founder hosts a high-dollar fundraiser for the president.

Why it matters: Billions of dollars — and, Google argues, the future of software innovation — are at stake as a long-running copyright dispute between the two giant companies heads to the Supreme Court next month.

Established VCs turn to "super angels" to grow their network

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Thanks to companies like AngelList and Carta that make it easier than ever to set up small VC funds, a new generation of so-called “super angels” is cropping up — and established venture funds are backing them.

Why it matters: Just like the boom in scout programs a number of years ago, it’s all about the deal flow.

Scoop: Top NSC official reassigned to Energy Department amid "Anonymous" fallout

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Deputy national security adviser Victoria Coates will be reassigned as a senior adviser to Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette, the National Security Council said Thursday — and a senior White House official said that the administration "rejects" the rumors that she is "Anonymous."

Why it matters: Coates has battled claims that she is the still-unknown Trump administration official that penned a New York Times op-ed and book critical of President Trump.