Feb 5, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump acquitted of obstruction of Congress

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate has voted 53-47 to acquit President Trump on obstruction of Congress, officially bringing an end to the impeachment proceedings that have roiled Washington for the past five months.

The big picture: Unlike the article of impeachment for abuse of power, which saw Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) break ranks, the obstruction vote fell strictly along party lines. The charge proved to be one of the more controversial aspects of the impeachment saga, with critics calling it a product of a rushed process after House investigators declined to take White House officials to court for defying subpoenas.

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Trump impeachment trial recap, day 13: Senate votes to acquit Trump

Photo: Senate Television via Getty Images

President Trump's Senate impeachment trial concluded Wednesday with a final vote (4pm ET) to acquit him on two articles brought by the House — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — after senators continue their debate on the issue.

The big picture: Trump's acquittal was always expected, but Wednesday saw an 11th hour twist in the impeachment trial as Sen. Mitt Romney voted in favor of convicting the president on abuse of power — the only Republican senator to break ranks.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 5, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Republicans and Democrats react to Mitt Romney voting to convict Trump

Romney and Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) at Trump's State of the Union address on Feb. 4. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

After Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) voted to convict President Trump for abuse of power in the impeachment trial Wednesday, Republicans doubled down to rebuke the senator while Democrats rushed to his defense.

What he's saying: "I am aware that there are people in my party and in my state who will strenuously disapprove of my decision, and in some quarters, I will be vehemently denounced," Romney said on the Senate floor Wednesday. "I am sure to hear abuse from the President and his supporters."

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 6, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Romney says he will not vote for Trump in 2020 election

Mitt Romney. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) made clear in an interview with The Atlantic on Wednesday that he will not vote for President Trump's re-election in November.

Driving the news: Romney sent shockwaves through Washington after announcing he would vote to convict Trump in the impeachment trial — becoming the only Senate Republican to break ranks and vote for the president's removal from office.