Photo: Ronen Tivony/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

One day after Super Tuesday, people close to President Trump said they aren't yet convinced Joe Biden will be the Democratic nominee — but that if he is, they're preparing to start hitting him again with attacks over his son Hunter's paid work and his dealings with Ukraine.

Why it matters: Top Democrats told Axios in the fall that they worried the controversy over Ukraine would drag Biden down, and polling showed his favorability and national and state leads declining as impeachment and questions about his son wore on.

  • If he succeeds in regaining and holding front-runner status, Trumpworld plans to make sure no one forgets the family baggage.

What we're hearing: "Just because the media has moved on doesn’t mean it’s gone,” one source close to the president told Axios.

  • Tying Biden's vice presidency to his son's paid work began to make him "damaged goods," this person said.
  • "Now, all of a sudden, he’s healed?"

The big picture: Trump campaign officials say they think the Democratic primary race is "far from over."

  • “Anybody who tells you they know how this will end is fooling you,” one said.
  • Trump and his supporters plan to paint the Democratic Party as socialist no matter who wins the nomination, the official said, because Sanders "made them talk about free health care" and other big-government ideas. “Whether or not Bernie is the opponent, his issues are on the ballot.”

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Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Wilmington, Delaware, on Monday. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden had $177.3 million in the bank at the end of September, per the latest Federal Election Commission filings.

Why it matters: President Trump's re-election campaign reported having $63.1 million in the bank at the end of last month.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots — University of Michigan students ordered to shelter-in-place.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 1 million infections.

Court allows North Carolina mail-in ballots deadline extension

An absentee ballot election worker stuffs ballot applications at the Mecklenburg County Board of Elections office in Charlotte, North Carolina, in September. Photo: Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

North Carolina can accept absentee ballots that are postmarked Nov. 3 on Election Day until Nov. 12, a federal appeals court decided Tuesday in a 12-3 majority ruling.

Why it matters: The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling against state and national Republican leaders settles a lawsuit brought by a group representing retirees, and it could see scores of additional votes counted in the key battleground state.