Thomas Barrack, executive chairman and CEO of Colony Capital, played an influential role in the campaign and acts as an outside adviser to the White House. Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images

Federal prosecutors are looking at foreign influence over President Trump's 2016 campaign, his transition and the early stages of his administration, the N.Y. Times reports under a quintuple byline (subscription):

  • "The relationship between Mr. Barrack, Mr. Manafort and representatives of the U.A.E. and Saudi Arabia, including Mr. al-Malik, has been of interest to federal authorities for at least nine months. The effort to influence Mr. Trump’s energy speech in 2016 was largely unsuccessful."
  • "The inquiry had proceeded far enough last month that [Tom] Barrack, who played an influential role in the campaign and acts as an outside adviser to the White House, was interviewed, at his request, by prosecutors in the public integrity unit of the United States attorney’s office in Brooklyn."

What they're saying: "Mr. Barrack’s spokesman, Owen Blicksilver, said ... Barrack’s lawyer had again contacted the prosecutors’ office and 'confirmed they have no further questions for Mr. Barrack.'"

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