Jan 10, 2018

Trump: Feinstein released dossier transcript in a "possibly illegal way"

California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein is the latest target of Trump's tweets. "The fact that Sneaky Dianne Feinstein ... would release testimony in such an underhanded and possibly illegal way, totally without authorization, is a disgrace. Must have tough Primary!" he wrote.

Our thought bubble: Feinstein is expected to face a primary challenge from Kevin de León, who is mounting a campaign as a more progressive alternative. Ironically, Trump's attacks on Feinstein could actually help position her as a stronger opponent to the president, which is what de León and progressives have been pressuring her to be.

The backdrop: Sen. Feinstein unilaterally released the controversial transcript of Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson about his firm's findings on Russia's interference in the 2016 election, as well as damning (but unsubstantiated) information on Trump's campaign. This could further strain her relationship with the top Republican member on the committee (Sen. Chuck Grassley), who previously declined to release this transcript.

Go deeper: Read excerpts from the transcript of Simpson's testimony.

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Wells Fargo agrees to pay $3 billion to settle consumer abuse charges

Clients use an ATM at a Wells Fargo Bank in Los Angeles, Calif. Photo: Ronen Tivony/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Wells Fargo agreed to a pay a combined $3 billion to the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday for opening millions of fake customer accounts between 2002 and 2016, the SEC said in a press release.

The big picture: The fine "is among the largest corporate penalties reached during the Trump administration," the Washington Post reports.

Bloomberg offers to release women from 3 nondisclosure agreements

Mike Bloomberg. Photo: Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

Mike Bloomberg said Friday his company will release women identified to have signed three nondisclosure agreements so they can publicly discuss their allegations against him if they wish.

Why it matters, via Axios' Margaret Talev: Bloomberg’s shift in policy toward NDAs comes as he tries to stanch his loss of female support after the Las Vegas debate. It is an effort to separate the total number of harassment and culture complaints at the large company from those directed at him personally. That could reframe the criticism against him, but also protect the company from legal fallout if all past NDAs were placed in jeopardy.