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Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Thanks to a leaky administration, everyone gets an inside look at how the Trump White House operates. Aides often leak stories about the difficulty of managing Trump — as if they were his babysitters. Here are some of the clearest examples, sourced from Axios, the New York Times, the Washington Post and Politico.

  • No more TV: Aides said they try to give Trump "better choices" or jam his schedule with meetings to keep him away from reading about or watching himself on TV (and then tweeting about it). An advisor told Washington Post, "Once he goes upstairs, there's no managing him."
  • Show and tell: Aides know Trump responds best to visuals. Typically, when someone wants to sell him on something they use props, according to Jonathan Swan. An official once told NYT, "The president likes maps."
  • Maps: In fact, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue used a map showing the "Trump country" areas of the U.S. that would be hardest hit by NAFTA's termination to convince Trump to keep the trade agreement, according to Washington Post.
  • No friends until work is done: Reince Priebus has tried to stop Trump's many visits with random aides, family, friends and reporters to the White House — which visually annoys the chief of staff — by filling up his schedule with ceremonial events, according to NYT.
  • Play time: Priebus has been busy making room in Trump's schedule to do whatever he wants. As NYT put it, "He has reduced the pace of public events and, like a Montessori teacher, modulates structured work time with the slack periods Mr. Trump craves."
  • Censoring polls: During the campaign, aides got used to digging up the two polls consistently favorable to him — Rasmussen and LA Times tracking poll, according to Swan.
  • The happy news: Staffers include positive, local news clippings in Trump's morning briefings instead of the possibly more negative headlines from a national paper, they told the Post.
  • The bad guys: When aides want to ensure someone doesn't get a job, they know to print out everything negative they've said about Trump. They know he's especially sensitive to disloyalty. This is partly what happened to Cathy McMorris with the interior secretary position.
  • No more tweets: Toward the end of the campaign, stories surfaced that aides had finally convinced Trump to let them handle Twitter.
  • Listen first: A confidante told Politico "If you're an adviser to him, your job is to help him at the margins. To talk him out of doing crazy things."
  • Simplifying: When it comes to making a policy or strategy decision, aides told Politico that it's best not to give Trump too many different options, but instead, thoroughly explain one, favored option and how the press would cover it. "You go in and tell him the pros and cons, and what the media coverage is going to be like."

Go deeper

Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat — Study: Trump campaign rallies likely led to over 700 COVID-related deaths.
  2. World: Boris Johnson announces month-long lockdown in England — Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike — Austria reimposes coronavirus lockdowns amid surge of infections.
  3. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  4. States: New York rolls out new testing requirements for visitors.

North Carolina police pepper-spray protesters marching to the polls

Officers in North Carolina used pepper spray on protesters and arrested eight people at a get-out-the-vote rally at Alamance County’s courthouse Saturday during the final day of early voting, the City of Graham Police Department confirmed.

Driving the news: The peaceful "I Am Change" march to the polls was organized by Rev. Greg Drumwright, from the Citadel Church in Greensboro, N.C., and included a minute's silence for George Floyd. Melanie Mitchell told the News & Observer her daughters, age 5 and 11, were among those pepper-sprayed by police soon after.

6 hours ago - Health

Boris Johnson announces month-long COVID-19 lockdown in England

Prime Minsiter Boris Johnson. Photo: NurPhoto / Getty Images

A new national lockdown will be imposed in England, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced Saturday, as the number of COVID-19 cases in the country topped 1 million.

Details: Starting Thursday, people in England must stay at home, and bars and restaurants will close, except for takeout and deliveries. All non-essential retail will also be shuttered. Different households will be banned from mixing indoors. International travel, unless for business purposes, will be banned. The new measures will last through at least December 2.