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The long trail of legal news about President Trump's associates — which now includes the indictment and arrest of Roger Stone — makes it easy to lose track of the broader storyline of Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. Here's a map to help you keep every move straight.

How it works: The map shows the people have been convicted, pleaded guilty or charged. Go deeper for other key figures and moments of the investigation. Note that Cohen's first guilty plea and Manafort's conviction were on charges unrelated to Russia — but they highlight Trump's broader legal jeopardy.

Expand chart
Diagram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios
Key events

Stone's arrest:

  • He was taken into custody in an early morning FBI raid in Florida Jan. 25 after being indicted on charges that lied about alleged communications with the Trump campaign about hacked emails possessed by WikiLeaks.

Cohen's guilty plea and sentence:

  • He pleaded guilty to eight counts related to tax fraud, making false statements to a financial institution, excessive campaign contributions, and unlawful corporate contributions. He said he was directed to violate campaign law at the direction of an unnamed candidate — implicating Trump.
  • In November, Cohen also pleaded guilty to lying to the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2017 about the length and scope of plans to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. He originally told the committee the work stopped in January 2016 and was not discussed with others in the Trump campaign. Mueller claims Cohen discussed getting Russian approval for the project as late as June 2016.
  • In December, Cohen was sentenced to 3 years in prison.

Russia:

Election interference:

  • 13 Russian nationals and 3 Russian entities were indicted on charges of violating criminal laws to interfere with the 2016 U.S. election.
    • On the same day, Mueller struck a plea deal with California resident Richard Pinedo who was accused of knowingly making tens of thousands of dollars by transferring hundreds of bank account numbers that were ultimately used to commit wire fraud.

The hacking:

  • 12 Russian military officers were indicted for hacking and releasing the emails of Democratic campaign organizations, including the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee, in an effort to interfere with the 2016 presidential election.

The Manafort verdict:

  • Manafort was found guilty on 8 criminal counts, including bank fraud, tax fraud and hiding a foreign bank account. The verdicts were focused on his activities as a lobbyist for Ukraine.
  • Mueller's team alleged Manafort violated his plea deal by lying repeatedly to federal investigators and the Mueller's team about his contact with the administration and a Russian.

Who's not on the list:

  • Donald Trump Jr. The bigger intrigue is about why there have been no reports that Mueller's team has questioned Trump Jr., given that he is a key player in one of the biggest events: the Trump Tower meeting with Manafort and Kushner. (He did testify before a Senate committee.)
  • President Trump has submitted written answers about pre-election dimensions of the Russia probe to Mueller's team, but did not answer questions about his behavior as president, including allegations of obstruction of justice.

This story has been updated with Stone's indictment and arrest.

Editor's note: Axios' David Nather, Lauren Meier, Haley Britzky, Lazaro Gamio and Andrew Witherspoon contributed to this story.

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's "overwhelming force" doctrine

President-elect Biden arrives to introduce his science team in Wilmington yesterday. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

President-elect Biden has ordered up a shock-and-awe campaign for his first days in office to signal, as dramatically as possible, the radical shift coming to America and global affairs, his advisers tell us. 

The plan, Part 1 ... Biden, as detailed in a "First Ten Days" memo from incoming chief of staff Ron Klain, plans to unleash executive orders, federal powers and speeches to shift to a stark, national plan for "100 million shots" in three months.

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear. Read episode 1.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.

Fringe right plots new attacks out of sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Domestic extremists are using obscure and private corners of the internet to plot new attacks ahead of Inauguration Day. Their plans are also hidden in plain sight, buried in podcasts and online video platforms.

Why it matters: Because law enforcement was caught flat-footed during last week's Capitol siege, researchers and intelligence agencies are paying more attention to online threats that could turn into real-world violence.