Dec 24, 2019

Toy stores get interactive with "experiential retail"

Children ride scooters on an elevated loop at Camp, a new chain of toy stores, in New York. Photo: Mark Lennihan/AP.

A new generation of toy stores hopes to capitalize on the demise of Toys R Us by emphasizing playtime with "experiential retail," AP writes.

Where it stands: Toy stores long offered activities and interactive elements, like the floor piano at FAO Schwarz that Tom Hanks danced on in "Big."

  • When FAO Schwarz opened a store in New York in 2018, three years after shuttering its 5th Avenue flagship, it added a toy grocery store where kids can shop for artificial produce, complete with small carts, and a Barbie doll fashion parlor that charges $75 for a styling session.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

The year of the mall makeover

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

In 2020, malls are trying to make a comeback — but with a twist.

Why it matters: Over the past few years, experts warned of a retail apocalypse and a massacre of malls that hasn't really happened — at least not the way they said it would. While the retail bastions of the 20th century, like Sears and Macy's, are hurting, America's big malls and shopping centers are still alive and finding new ways to get people through the door.

FDA issues ban on fruit and mint-flavored vape cartridges

People take part in a rally at the steps of City Hall after New York City Council. Photo: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration issued a ban on Thursday on fruit and mint-flavored vaping cartridges like the pods made by Juul, but with exemptions for tobacco and menthol.

Why it matters: The ban is meant to curb e-cigarette use among children who have been attracted to cartridge vapes due to their flavors, cheap price and concealing features of size and small vape clouds.

Go deeperArrowJan 2, 2020 - Health

Lawmakers offer bipartisan update to children's online privacy law

Reps. Bobby Rush (L) and Tim Walberg. Photos: Alex Wong/Getty Images; Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call.

House lawmakers are introducing a bipartisan bill Thursday to update a long-standing children's online privacy law so that parents could force companies to delete personal information collected about their kids.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020