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Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Rep. Tony Cárdenas (D-Calif.) is running for chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), as Democrats look for new leadership after failing to expand their House majority in last week's election, according to a source familiar.

Why it matters: Cardenas' consideration for this leadership post reflects a recognition among Democrats that they need to shore up their support with Hispanic voters and better understand the nuances of the Latino community to improve their electoral prospects.

Driving the news: Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.) announced Monday she will not seek re-election for DCCC chair, after narrowly eking out a win in her own re-election race, Politico first reported.

  • Cardenas is the chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus' BOLD PAC, which supports Hispanic Democratic candidates down-ballot.
  • Trump won 28% of the Latino vote in 2016, and increased his standing to roughly 32% in 2020.
  • He increased his support with Latino voters in Texas, south Florida, and areas across California, Arizona, Colorado, North Carolina, Wisconsin and Nevada, per The Atlantic.

What they're saying: In a letter to his colleagues making the case for serving as DCCC chair, Cardenas specifically highlighted "Black and Brown communities showing up at the polls in states like Arizona, Michigan, Nevada, Georgia, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania."

  • "However, the night was not without some immense disappointments and I feel an unshakeable sense of loss and frustration for all our colleagues that will not be returning in the new Congress," he continued.

What to watch: Other Democrats are expected to announce their intention to run for the position as well, including Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.), according to a source familiar.

Go deeper

Labor groups ask Pelosi to apply trade test to Foreign Affairs chair

Pelosi. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Labor groups are urging House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to oppose a bid by Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.) to lead the House Foreign Affairs Committee, arguing that his "pro-corporate trade" stances should preclude him from being elected to the powerful position.

What they're saying: "How America’s trade is structured, and by whom, is fundamental in determining whether we advance workers’ rights," the Communications Workers of America, Teamsters, United Brotherhood of Carpenters, and International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers write in a letter obtained by Axios.

35 mins ago - Sports

The end of COVID’s grip on sports may be in sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Packed stadiums and a more normal fan experience could return by late 2021, NIAID director Anthony Fauci said yesterday.

Why it matters: If Fauci's prediction comes true, it could save countless programs from going extinct next year.

Trump's 2024 begins

Trump speaking to reporters in the White House on Thanksgiving. Photo: Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images

President Trump is likely to announce he'll run again in 2024, perhaps before this term even ends, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has already set in motion two important strategies to stay relevant and freeze out other Republican rivals.