Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson on Feb. 9 in Hollywood, California. Photo: Amy Sussman/Getty Images

Actor Tom Hanks said in a statement posted to Twitter Sunday night that he and his wife, Rita Wilson, "feel better" two weeks on from experiencing their first symptoms of the novel coronavirus in Australia.

Why it matters: Per the statement of Hanks, who's in self-isolation with Wilson at a home in the state of Queensland: "Sheltering in place works like this: You don't give it to anyone — You don't get it from anyone. Common sense, no? Going to take a while, but if we take care of each other, help where we can, and give up some comforts... this, too, shall pass. We can figure this out."

The big picture: Australia has reported more than 1,300 COVID-19 cases and seven deaths as of Sunday night, per Johns Hopkins University data.

  • The couple announced their positive Covid-19 diagnosis on March 11 and were released from hospital last Monday, their son Chet Hanks confirmed.
  • They were in Australia because Tom Hanks was filming an Elvis Presley biopic. The diagnosis caused filming to be shut down, per Variety.

What they're saying: "We felt a bit tired, like we had colds and some body aches," Tom Hanks said in an earlier Instagram post. "Rita had some chills that came and went. Slight fevers too."

  • Hanks also thanked "everyone here Down Under who are taking such good care of us." And he showed his gratitude in a Twitter post that sparked an intense debate about how much of the beloved Aussie spread Vegemite you should put on toast.

Go deeper: Coronavirus forces Hollywood into uncharted territory

Editor's note: This article has been updated with details of the couple's release from hospital and Hanks' latest comments.

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