Jan 23, 2020

Tinder to debut panic button for when users feel unsafe

Photo: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tinder will debut a feature later this month that will allow users to hit a panic button if they feel physically unsafe on a date gone wrong, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: Critics have previously called out Tinder for not doing more to ensure the safety of users and filtering out possibly dangerous users, especially following reports of sexual assaults after connections made via the app.

The big picture: Tinder's parent company, Match Group, has invested in the app Noonlight, which tracks the location of users and alerts authorities when there are safety concerns.

  • "Tinder's move shows how some online platforms are investing more in the physical safety of users, while also highlighting the privacy trade-offs that often entails," the Journal writes.

How it works: Users will be able to put a badge on their profile that shows they use Noonlight's services. They will also be able to log information about their meet-ups ahead of time, such as when and where they take place.

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Deep Dive: The gamification of courtship

Editor's note: This deep dive was originally published on Valentine's Day, 2019.

The gamification of courtship has gone global, from viral matchmaker shows in China to Tinder users who don't stop swiping even after finding love.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 14, 2020 - Technology

Match Group CEO Mandy Ginsberg steps down

Mindy Ginsburg. Photo: Jerod Harris/Getty Images for Fortune

Mandy Ginsberg on Tuesday announced that she is stepping down as longtime CEO of Match Group, the owner of online dating sites including Match and Tinder.

Driving the news: Ginsberg told Match employees in an internal email, obtained by Axios, that her decision was more personal than professional, as a tornado had recently made her home "unlivable" and that she has had health issues, including a surgery just last Friday.

Facebook to pay $550 million over facial recognition tagging system

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook said on Wednesday it will pay $550 million in response to an Illinois-based class-action lawsuit against the facial recognition technology in its photo-labeling service, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: The settlement is a sign that state-level regulations on facial recognition can extract real penalties from social media giants like Facebook, as more states introduce bills to regulate, ban or study the tech.

Go deeperArrowJan 30, 2020