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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Grindr, OkCupid, Tinder, Qibla Finder and MyDays X are among 10 apps feeding user data — such as ethnicity, location, gender and age — to digital ad companies, nonprofit Norwegian Consumer Council found in a report released on Tuesday.

Why it matters: These dating, prayer guidance and menstrual cycle or fertility tracking apps collect information from some of the most intimate parts of users' lives. The council argues that sharing this data violates a European data protection law that went into effect last year.

What they found: OkCupid sent user data about sexual desires, drug and alcohol use, and political views to analytics company Braze, as well as users' ethnicity and GPS coordinates.

  • Tinder shared users' GPS location and "target gender" — or data on sexual orientation. Facebook and Salesforce got information to track users across different services through advertising IDs, which don't necessarily attach names to data.
  • Grindr, an LGBTQ dating site, shared users' location to AT&T's AppNexus, Twitter's MoPub, OpenX, AdColony and others.
  • MyDays, a period tracker and fertility app, provided users' IP addresses, GPS location and WiFi access point information.

Flashback: Grindr changed its policy of sharing users' HIV status with its third-party vendors last year after initially defending its position.

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Ina Fried: There’s a fundamental disconnect between the amount of information one would normally share with an online service and the information needed to find a compatible mate.

What they're saying: "I think most American, most people, don't realize how much data your phone is generating about you and your life every single day," John Demers, assistant attorney general for national security at the Justice Department, told NBC News. NBC analyzed four popular dating apps, including Grindr and Tinder, to see what information is collected.

  • The Match Group, which owns Tinder and OkCupid, said in a statement that it only shares information in line with the California Consumer Privacy Act and the GDPR, and doesn't commercialize users' data. Match Group's products were not named in NCC companion complaints filed with the Norwegian Data Protection Authority.
  • Grindr did not respond to request for comment. The company told the New York Times in a statement on Tuesday that it had not received a copy of the report and could not comment on its content.

What's next: The council's formal complaints against Grindr, Twitter's ad platform and AT&T's AppNexus could mean fines — like the $57 million penalty slapped on Google in 2018 over telling users how their data is collected.

Go deeper: Location data is ground zero in privacy wars

Editor's note: This piece has been updated with a Match Group statement that its products were not named in NCC companion complaints.

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled late Wednesday that restrictions previously imposed on New York places of worship by Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) during the coronavirus pandemic violated the First Amendment.

Why it matters: The decision in a 5-4 vote heralds the first significant action by the new President Trump-appointed conservative Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who cast the deciding vote in favor of the Catholic Church and Orthodox Jewish synagogues.

USAID chief tests positive for coronavirus

An Air Force cargo jet delivers USAID supplies to Russia earlier this year. Photo: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images

The acting administrator of the United States Agency for International Development informed senior staff Wednesday he has tested positive for coronavirus, two sources familiar with the call tell Axios.

Why it matters: John Barsa, who staffers say rarely wears a mask in their office, is the latest in a series of senior administration officials to contract the virus. His positive diagnosis comes amid broader turmoil at the agency following the election.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
11 hours ago - Health

COVID-19 shows a bright future for vaccines

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Promising results from COVID-19 vaccine trials offer hope not just that the pandemic could be ended sooner than expected, but that medicine itself may have a powerful new weapon.

Why it matters: Vaccines are, in the words of one expert, "the single most life-saving innovation ever," but progress had slowed in recent years. New gene-based technology that sped the arrival of the COVID vaccine will boost the overall field, and could even extend to mass killers like cancer.