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Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told NBC's "Today" on Tuesday that he believes mail-in voting during the 2020 election "will prove to work out just fine."

Why it matters: President Trump has continually claimed without evidence that increased mail-in voting amid the coronavirus pandemic will lead to widespread voter fraud. He has pledged to block funding for mail-in voting and the U.S. Postal Service.

What he's saying: Scott, who headlined the first night of the Republican National Convention on Monday, said he has "a lot of confidence in our electoral process" when asked about Trump's claims.

  • "I'm very confident that we'll have fair elections throughout this country. And most of the issues that remain are going to be local issues. Having served in local government, I have a lot of confidence in how we are going to take care of this election cycle."
  • "I think every single American should have the right to vote. How we do so is important, that we do so is more important. And I'm gonna have confidence that all the moving pieces will actually fit together, and we'll have a very strong, integrity-driven, character-driven election."

Go deeper

Paul Ryan calls on Trump to concede race and end lawsuits

Paul Ryan and Joe Biden after the vice presidential debate in 2012. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R) on Tuesday called on President Trump to concede the election to President-elect Biden and "embrace the transfer of power," in an address at a financial conference first reported by Politico.

Why it matters: Trump has continued to deny that he lost the election, despite his administration granting so-called "ascertainment" on Monday, allowing the transition to formally begin.

Pennsylvania certifies Biden's victory

Photo: Aimee Dilger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Pennsylvania officials on Tuesday certified the state's presidential election results, making President-elect Joe Biden's win in the key battleground official.

Why it matters: The move deals another blow to President Trump's failed efforts to block certification in key swing states that he lost to Biden. It also comes one day after officials voted to certify Biden's victory in Michigan.

Updated Nov 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The top Republicans who have acknowledged Biden as president-elect

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Some elected Republicans are breaking ranks with President Trump to acknowledge that President-elect Biden won the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: The relative sparsity of acknowledgements highlights Trump's lasting power in the GOP, as his campaign moves to file multiple lawsuits alleging voter fraud in key swing states — despite the fact that there have been no credible allegations of any widespread fraud anywhere in the U.S.