Mar 8, 2020 - Technology

Tim Cook to allow most Apple staff to work from home this week

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Apple CEO Tim Cook has informed employees in most global offices that they may work from home between March 9–13 as the company grapples with the "unprecedented" coronavirus outbreak, according to a memo first reported by Bloomberg and confirmed by Axios.

The big picture: Apple joins a chorus of other companies encouraging workers in Seattle or the Bay Area to work from home, including Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft and Salesforce. Apple, like these other companies, said in the memo will continue to pay its hourly staff while full-time workers telecommute.

Go deeper: Apple's coronavirus warning foreshadows broader threat for tech

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Apple allows push notifications for ads

Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp displayed on an iPhone. Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Apps on Apple products can now send push notifications for ads and promotions as long as customers explicitly opt in to get those alerts, according to the company's updated App Store guidelines.

Why it matters: Apple has long prevented ads in notifications. Including marketing material alongside alerts for personal messages and breaking news runs the risk of further cluttering peoples' feeds.

Facebook contractor diagnosed with coronavirus in Seattle

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

A Facebook contractor who works in the tech giant's Stadium East office in Seattle has been diagnosed with the novel coronavirus, a company spokesperson confirmed in a statement to Axios early Thursday.

The big picture: "We've notified our employees and are following the advice of public health officials to prioritize everyone's health and safety," the spokesperson said. The worker was last in the office Feb. 21. It was immediately shut and is due to reopen this Monday, when the incubation period ends. Facebook is encouraging all Seattle site staff to work remotely until March 31. On Tuesday, an Amazon employee in Seattle tested positive for COVID-19, as Washington grapples with a spike in cases.

Go deeper: Washington schools shut as Gov. Inslee seeks $100M to fight coronavirus

Mark Cuban vows to help hourly workers impacted by NBA coronavirus move

Mark Cuban at the SiriusXM Studios in New York City in February. Photo: Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban told ESPN Wednesday that his team would "put together a program" for hourly workers who'd lose work after the NBA suspended the season following a Utah Jazz player testing positive for the novel coronavirus.

Why it matters: Cuban's remarks during his team's game against the Denver Nuggets come as momentum builds to compensate hourly workers impacted by the virus. Tech giants have led the charge, with Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Twitter pledging to pay hourly workers including cooks and cleaners regular wages. Cuban said at a news conference later he's more worried about his family than the NBA games suspension.

Go deeper: Tech giants promise to pay hourly workers while employees telecommute