Nov 28, 2018

Controversial Trump judicial nominee survives key Senate vote

Thomas Farr at a hearing last year. Screenshot via the Senate Judiciary Committee website.

Thomas Farr, President Trump's controversial nominee to become a district judge in North Carolina, survived a key procedural Senate vote Wednesday after Vice President Mike Pence broke a 50-50 tie, inching him closer to confirmation.

Why it matters: Farr’s record of supporting restrictive voting measures as an attorney in North Carolina has sparked backlash among Democrats and civil rights groups. Sen. Jeff Flake joined all Senate Democrats in opposing Farr in the vote, which preceded an expected final confirmation vote on his nomination later this week.

Go deeper: Trump judicial pick in limbo, seen as a threat to voting rights

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Coronavirus updates: Italy reports 889 deaths since Friday

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

Italy has reported 889 new deaths since Friday. The country has the highest death count from the novel coronavirus.

The big picture: The U.S. leads the world in confirmed coronavirus cases, as the number of global cases nears 650,000. Governments around the world are trying to curb the medical and financial fallout of COVID-19, as infections surge across Europe and the U.S.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 46 mins ago - Health

Trump weighs quarantine of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

President Trump said on Saturday he is considering a "short term" quarantine of New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut — states that have already taken steps to quarantine residents and promote social distancing.

The big picture: With 112,000 people infected, the U.S. has the most COVID-19 cases in the world, exceeding China and Italy, per data from Johns Hopkins. A second wave of American cities, including Boston, Detroit, New Orleans and Philadelphia, are reporting influxes of cases.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health

Q&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

As the coronavirus continues to spread throughout the U.S., Axios is answering readers' questions about the pandemic — how it spreads, who's at risk, and what you can do to stay safe.

What's new: This week, we answer five questions on smokers' vulnerability, food safety, visiting older parents, hair cut needs, and rural vs. urban impact.