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Clockwise from top left:

Uber is still figuring out the full plan to change its frat culture image, but it's clear that a helpful step is increasing the ranks of women in upper management — four have been added in recent weeks.

The big question: One job Uber needs to fill is chief operating officer, which would ideally go to a seasoned female executive to help re-balance its company culture, according to Recode. The company kicked off the search in March in response to a former employee's explosive allegations of sexism and discrimination and trade-secret theft from Waymo.

Among its executive ranks, during the past few weeks Uber:

Arianna Huffington, who joined Uber's board last year, took the lead in its ongoing investigation of its workplace issues.

Uber says that these recent hires and promotions aren't part of any quotas or due to pressure to hire more female executives. Instead, these women were simply the best candidates for the jobs, the company told Axios. The timing is also a coincidence, Uber argues — hiring executives takes a long time.

And, it's worth noting that two of Uber's top executives — Rachel Holt and Austin Geidt — have been with the company long before this crisis erupted.

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
43 mins ago - Health

Who benefits from Biden's move to reopen ACA enrollment

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nearly 15 million Americans who are currently uninsured are eligible for coverage on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces, and more than half of them would qualify for subsidies, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation brief.

Why it matters: President Biden is expected to announce today that he'll be reopening the marketplaces for a special enrollment period from Feb. 15 to May 15, but getting a significant number of people to sign up for coverage will likely require targeted outreach.

2 hours ago - Technology

Big Tech bolts politics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Big Tech fed politics. Then it bled politics. Now it wants to be dead to politics. 

Why it matters: The social platforms that profited massively on politics and free speech suddenly want a way out — or at least a way to hide until the heat cools. 

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

GameStop as a metaphor

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A half-forgotten and unprofitable videogame retailer is, bizarrely and incredibly, on the lips of the nation. That's because the GameStop story touches on economic and cultural forces that affect everyone, whether they own a single share of stock or not.

Why it matters: In most Wall Street fights, the broader public doesn't have a rooting interest. This one — where a group of small traders won a multi-billion-dollar bet against giant hedge funds by buying stock in GameStop — is different.