Nov 7, 2019

The U.S. health care system is not the best in the world

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Adapted from OECD Health at a Glance, 2019; Table: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Americans pay the most for health care, by far, out of all developed countries. But we don't have much to show for it in terms of health outcomes or access to care, according to a new OECD report.

Why it matters: As we debate reforms to our health care system, it's worth remembering that the U.S. is an outlier compared to other countries, which have figured out how to get cheaper care without sacrificing quality.

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We all pay for the bloated U.S. health care system

Data: OECD; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Americans pay higher out-of-pocket costs than most other wealthy countries, a byproduct of having the most expensive health care system in the world, according to the OECD.

Why it matters: Health care costs are at the heart of today's most explosive health care debates, including Medicare for All, prescription drug prices and surprise medical bills.

Go deeperArrowNov 13, 2019

Health care hiring is recession-proof

Photo: Hinterhaus Productions/Getty Images

Health care hiring is driving the labor market, and it's so robust that it likely would be safe even during a recession or political upheaval, CNN Business reports.

Between the lines: No matter what happens, the population is aging and will need care.

Go deeperArrowNov 19, 2019

Mental health coverage is getting worse

Data: Mental Health Treatment and Research Institute; Chart: Axios Visuals

As suicide and overdose rates have increased, mental health and substance abuse insurance coverage has gotten worse, according to a new Milliman report commissioned by the Mental Health Treatment and Research Institute.

Why it matters: Behavioral health treatment often isn't covered by insurance, and it's often unaffordable — including for patients for whom treatment is a matter of life and death.

Go deeperArrowNov 21, 2019 - Health