Donald Trump and Ivanka Trump join Rick Gates (center) and then-campaign chair Paul Manafort (back) at the Republican National Convention in 2016. Photo: Evan Vucci / AP

In yesterday's historic crush of news, we saw early hints of the coming political and corporate reckoning for Russian interference in the 2016 election:

The takeaway: For the White House, the most worrisome part of the Manafort indictment is that Mueller showed he's willing to delve deeply into personal financial matters as part of his Russia probe.

  • Just before 8 a.m.., media bulletins say former Trump campaign officials Paul Manafort, 68, and his business associate Rick Gates, 45, have been told to surrender.
  • At 9:01 a.m., Mueller's office announces indictment of Manafort and Gates.
  • At 10:14 a.m., Mueller's office announces guilty plea of low-level Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos, 30, for making false statements to FBI agents. Reading between the lines of the indictment, legal commentators quickly conclude Papadopoulos may have been wearing a wire in recent months.
  • At 10:25 a.m., Trump tweets: "Sorry, but this is years ago, before Paul Manafort was part of the Trump campaign. But why aren't Crooked Hillary & the Dems the focus?????"
  • At 10:28 a.m., Trump adds: "....Also, there is NO COLLUSION!"
  • Just after 6 p.m., in time for the network newscasts, leaks surface of the Facebook statement for today's congressional hearing: "Our best estimate is that approximately 126 million people may have been served one of their stories at some point during the two-year period."
  • Then Google's: "On YouTube, we did find 18 channels on YouTube with roughly 1,100 videos, a total of 43 hours of content, uploaded by individuals who we suspect are associated with [the Russian] effort."
  • And Twitter's: "[W]e identified 36,746 accounts that generated automated, election-related content and had at least one of the characteristics we used to associate an account with Russia."

Be smart: There is zero doubt — and piles of new evidence — that Russia manipulated our election. This next phase will show if Trump himself was aware or involved, or has any interest in doing anything about it — and how extensively America's most powerful companies enabled the mass manipulation.

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What Matters 2020

The missed opportunities for 2020 and beyond

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Jason Armond (Los Angeles Times), Noam Galai, Jabin Botsford (The Washington Post), Alex Wong/Getty Images

As the 2020 presidential campaign draws to a close, President Trump and Joe Biden have focused little on some of the most sweeping trends that will outlive the fights of the moment.

Why it matters: Both have engaged on some issues, like climate change and China, on their own terms, and Biden has addressed themes like economic inequality that work to his advantage. But others have gone largely unmentioned — a missed opportunity to address big shifts that are changing the country.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Pence chief of staff Marc Short tests positive for coronavirus — COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations
  2. Health: Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear them — America was sick well before it ever got COVID-19
  3. World: Polish President Andrzej Duda tests positive for COVID-19.

Pence chief of staff Marc Short tests positive for coronavirus

Marc Short with Katie Miller, Vice President Pence's communications director, in March. Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times via Reuters

Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, tested positive for the coronavirus Saturday and is quarantining, according to a White House statement.

Why it matters: Short is Pence's closest aide, and was one of the most powerful forces on the White House coronavirus task force.