Actor Kevin Spacey is one of the Hollywood figures accused of harassment. Photo: Scott Kirkland / AP

The public allegations against Harvey Weinstein, which first came to light over a month ago in the New York Times, started a domino effect of powerful men being called out for their inappropriate behavior towards men and women alike.

Why it matters: These men are losing everything: book deals are falling through, lawsuits are being filed, they're quitting their jobs (or being forced out), losing their companies, and more. This sends a message to predators throughout industries: if you abuse your power and position, you will lose.

The price of being a creep:

  • Harvey Weinstein - lost his company, and is under investigation. The Manhattan district attorney is seeking approval for an indictment as early as next week.
  • Kevin Spacey - replaced in upcoming film "All the Money in the World," dropped by his agency, publicist, and Netflix.
  • Mark Halperin - lost his book deal, an HBO series, and contributing spots with NBC and MSNBC.
  • James Toback - dropped by his talent agency.
  • Michael Fallon - resigned as U.K. defense minister.
  • Michael Oreskes - resigned as NPR news chief.
  • Roy Price - resigned as Amazon Studios director.
  • Leon Wieseltier - financial support for his magazine was pulled before launch.
  • John Besh - stepped down as CEO of Besh Restaurant Group, Harrah's New Orleans Casino has cut relations with the company.
  • Brett Ratner - Warner Bros. severed ties with the director, and Playboy Enterprises is shelving projects in which he's involved.
  • Lockhart Steele - fired from Vox Media as editorial director.
  • Chris Savino - fired by Nickelodeon.
  • Kirk Webster - lost his country music PR company (which changed its name to Westby PR) and was dropped by clients like Randy Travis, Dolly Parton, and Kid Rock.
  • Terry Richardson - Condé Nast International cut ties with the fashion photographer.

What to watch for: There are several men who have been accused (U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, Sen. Al Franken) who have not yet faced consequences.

Go deeper: Men behaving badly; The powerful men accused this week of sexual harassment.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Asset managers at major U.S. investment firms are starting to get bullish with their clients, encouraging stock buying and trying not to get left behind right as the metrics on tech stocks rise back to highs not seen since the dot-com crash of 2000.

What's happening: Appetite for stocks is starting to return, but slowly as institutional money managers were overwhelmingly sitting on the sidelines in cash during April and May.

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China bans Cruz and Rubio over Xinjiang criticism

Photos: Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images; Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images

China said Monday that it will ban entry to Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) over their criticisms of human rights abuses in Xinjiang, the AP reports.

The big picture: The move seems to be retaliatory after the U.S. announced sanctions on four Chinese officials for human rights abuses against Uighur Muslims and other ethnic minorities in the region last week.

Roger Stone says he plans to campaign for Trump

Roger Stone appears yesterday outside his home in Fort Lauderdale. Photo: Johnny Louis/Getty Images

Roger Stone told Axios in a phone interview that he plans to write and speak for President Trump's re-election now that Stone "won't die in a squalid hellhole of corona-19 virus."

"I'm asthmatic," said Stone, 67. "Sending me to a prison where I could not be socially distanced ... would, I think, be a death sentence."