Nov 22, 2017

Men behaving badly

The bombshell report from The New York Times last month on decades of sexual harassment and assault by producer Harvey Weinstein started a domino effect as other women spoke out about mistreatment by men in positions of power.

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Global #MeToo movement has resulted in 6 convictions, 5 charges of influential figures

Bill Cosby, Larry Nassar and Allison Mack have been convicted on charges related to sexual misconduct. Photos: Matt Rourke-Pool, Jeff Kowalsky/AFP and Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Hundreds of powerful people — predominately men — have been accused of sexual offenses since the #MeToo movement went viral in 2017. After Jeffrey Epstein's death, only five of them currently face charges, while six others have been convicted.

Why it matters: The #MeToo movement, which was created by civil rights activist Tarana Burke and gained traction after allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein came to light in 2017, focused global attention on previously unchecked sexual misconduct, leading at least 201 powerful men to lose jobs or major positions. But the movement, dubbed a global reckoning, has had few legal consequences for the accused. Here are some of the most notable cases.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 8, 2020

Women outpace men on U.S. payrolls

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Note: Men count was derived by subtracting women count from total; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

There are more women on American payrolls than men as of the latest U.S. jobs report.

Why it matters: The data reflects a hiring boom in industries that are female-dominated, while sectors that are more likely to employ men are lagging in job gains. The last time women overtook men in payrolls was “during a stretch between June 2009 and April 2010,” according to the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the milestone.

Go deeperArrowJan 10, 2020

LGBTQ+ individuals face harassment in astronomy, planetary science

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

LGBTQPAN* women and gender non-conforming individuals in astronomy and planetary science face harassment in their workplaces, according to a new study in the Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society.

Why it matters: The study is a stark look into the hostile environment many members of the astronomy and planetary science community face at work.

Go deeperArrowDec 17, 2019