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From right, Mark Halperin, Michael Oreskes and Jann Wenner. Photo: Richard Shotwell, Chuck Zoeller, Evan Agostini / AP

Long-time television host Charlie Rose is the latest man in the media realm in the post-Weinstein era to be charged with sexual harassment. Eight different women have charged him with making unwanted sexual advances, groping and making lewd phone calls.

Why it matters: No industry or business is left out – not even news agencies reporting on these allegations. The incessant accusations from women show that we have a systemic problem — for too long we've allowed a culture where powerful men think they can get away with sexually harassing female colleagues and employees .

  1. Matt Lauer: The NBC anchor was fired on Tuesday after accusations of sexually inappropriate behavior in the workplace.
  2. Charlie Rose: The TV show host has been accused by eight women of groping them, making unwanted sexual advances, walking around naked in front of them and making lewd phone calls during the early and mid 2000s, the New York Times reported on Monday.
  3. Glenn Thrush: The prominent NYT journalist has been suspended following accusations from several younger, female journalists that he made unwanted sexual advances toward them.
  4. Mark Halperin: The NBC analyst and contributor lost his job as well as book and TV show deals after 12 different women accused him of sexual harassment from while he was at ABC News.
  5. Lockhart Steele: The editorial director for Vox was fired after admitting to sexual misconduct. There is currently an investigation into claims of sexual misconduct by other Vox employees brought by a former employee.
  6. Stephen Blackwell: The Billboard Magazine executive was accused of sexual harassment by a former intern and resigned from his position at the magazine.
  7. Michael Oreskes: The NPR news chief was put on leave from the media company after several accusations of sexual harassment by at least four women who claimed the behavior occurred while Oreskes was at the New York Times, NPR and AP.
  8. Roger LaMay: The NPR board chairman has announced he'll step down from his position at the end of his term, but NPR reported that he is the subject of complaints about inappropriate behavior.
  9. Jann Wenner: The founder and publisher of Rolling Stone magazine was accused of offering a male writer a freelance contract in exchange for sex. Wenner has admitted that an encounter took place, but said he never made a career offer in exchange for sex.
  10. Leon Wieseltier: The New Republic editor has admitted to and apologized for "workplace misconduct," which led to the cancellation of his forthcoming culture magazine. Wieseltier was also removed from leadership at The Atlantic magazine.
  11. Matt Zimmerman: The NBC News producer was let go after being accused of inappropriate conduct by multiple women.
  12. Hamilton Fish: The president and publisher of New Republic was placed on leave while several complaints of his sexual harassment toward women are investigated.
  13. Jimmy Soni: As Ariana Huffington became the head of fixing Uber's bad reputation, attention was drawn to the former HuffPost editor Soni, who left to launch HuffPost India in 2014 while reportedly being investigated for sexual misconduct.
  14. Giuseppe Castellano: Penguin Random House is investigating a sexual harassment accusation against Castellano, its art director.
  15. Knight Landesman: The Artforum magazine publisher resigned from the company after being accused by several women, and sued by one, for sexual harassment.
  16. Kirt Webster: One woman has accused the Webster Public Relations CEO of sexual assault. Webster has taken leave from his firm, which has been renamed.
  17. Roy Price: The Amazon executive resigned after a woman accused him of sexual harassment.

Don't forget: Fox's Bill O'Reilly and Roger Ailes started the chain of sexual harassment and assault allegations in big media companies.

Go deeper

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.

John Weaver, Lincoln Project co-founder, acknowledges “inappropriate” messages

John Weaver aboard John McCain's campaign plane in February 2000. Photo: Robert Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images)

John Weaver, a veteran Republican operative who co-founded the Lincoln Project, declared in a statement to Axios on Friday that he sent “inappropriate,” sexually charged messages to multiple men.

  • “To the men I made uncomfortable through my messages that I viewed as consensual mutual conversations at the time: I am truly sorry. They were inappropriate and it was because of my failings that this discomfort was brought on you,” Weaver said.
  • “The truth is that I'm gay,” he added. “And that I have a wife and two kids who I love. My inability to reconcile those two truths has led to this agonizing place.”