Nov 20, 2017

The men in media accused of sexual harassment

From right, Mark Halperin, Michael Oreskes and Jann Wenner. Photo: Richard Shotwell, Chuck Zoeller, Evan Agostini / AP

Long-time television host Charlie Rose is the latest man in the media realm in the post-Weinstein era to be charged with sexual harassment. Eight different women have charged him with making unwanted sexual advances, groping and making lewd phone calls.

Why it matters: No industry or business is left out – not even news agencies reporting on these allegations. The incessant accusations from women show that we have a systemic problem — for too long we've allowed a culture where powerful men think they can get away with sexually harassing female colleagues and employees .

  1. Matt Lauer: The NBC anchor was fired on Tuesday after accusations of sexually inappropriate behavior in the workplace.
  2. Charlie Rose: The TV show host has been accused by eight women of groping them, making unwanted sexual advances, walking around naked in front of them and making lewd phone calls during the early and mid 2000s, the New York Times reported on Monday.
  3. Glenn Thrush: The prominent NYT journalist has been suspended following accusations from several younger, female journalists that he made unwanted sexual advances toward them.
  4. Mark Halperin: The NBC analyst and contributor lost his job as well as book and TV show deals after 12 different women accused him of sexual harassment from while he was at ABC News.
  5. Lockhart Steele: The editorial director for Vox was fired after admitting to sexual misconduct. There is currently an investigation into claims of sexual misconduct by other Vox employees brought by a former employee.
  6. Stephen Blackwell: The Billboard Magazine executive was accused of sexual harassment by a former intern and resigned from his position at the magazine.
  7. Michael Oreskes: The NPR news chief was put on leave from the media company after several accusations of sexual harassment by at least four women who claimed the behavior occurred while Oreskes was at the New York Times, NPR and AP.
  8. Roger LaMay: The NPR board chairman has announced he'll step down from his position at the end of his term, but NPR reported that he is the subject of complaints about inappropriate behavior.
  9. Jann Wenner: The founder and publisher of Rolling Stone magazine was accused of offering a male writer a freelance contract in exchange for sex. Wenner has admitted that an encounter took place, but said he never made a career offer in exchange for sex.
  10. Leon Wieseltier: The New Republic editor has admitted to and apologized for "workplace misconduct," which led to the cancellation of his forthcoming culture magazine. Wieseltier was also removed from leadership at The Atlantic magazine.
  11. Matt Zimmerman: The NBC News producer was let go after being accused of inappropriate conduct by multiple women.
  12. Hamilton Fish: The president and publisher of New Republic was placed on leave while several complaints of his sexual harassment toward women are investigated.
  13. Jimmy Soni: As Ariana Huffington became the head of fixing Uber's bad reputation, attention was drawn to the former HuffPost editor Soni, who left to launch HuffPost India in 2014 while reportedly being investigated for sexual misconduct.
  14. Giuseppe Castellano: Penguin Random House is investigating a sexual harassment accusation against Castellano, its art director.
  15. Knight Landesman: The Artforum magazine publisher resigned from the company after being accused by several women, and sued by one, for sexual harassment.
  16. Kirt Webster: One woman has accused the Webster Public Relations CEO of sexual assault. Webster has taken leave from his firm, which has been renamed.
  17. Roy Price: The Amazon executive resigned after a woman accused him of sexual harassment.

Don't forget: Fox's Bill O'Reilly and Roger Ailes started the chain of sexual harassment and assault allegations in big media companies.

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