Evan Vucci / AP

The Washington Examiner reports that a copy of a top secret GOP bill to repeal and replace Obamacare will be made available to Republican lawmakers in the basement of a House office building tomorrow. No one will be allowed to take a copy.

And, per The Hill, the House Energy and Commerce Committee is planning to hold a markup on the legislation sometime next week, though committee member Chris Collins noted that "plans do change." Collins also added that it's likely that the bill won't have a Congressional Budget Office score by the time of the markup.

Why it matters: The GOP is still massively divided on some aspects of what replacement might look like, including tax credits and Medicaid expansion, but this breakneck pace might force the party to coalesce around a solution sooner rather than later.

Go deeper

SurveyMonkey poll: Trump improves, but not enough

Trump and Biden during the final debate. Photo: Xinhua/Liu Jie via Getty Images

President Trump's final debate performance exceeded Americans' expectations, but it wasn't enough to shift the dynamics that left him trailing Joe Biden across most measures, according to a new Axios-SurveyMonkey poll.

What they're saying: "Liar" was the word used most by debate watchers to describe Trump's performance, followed by "lies," "strong," "presidential" and "childish." "Presidential" was the word used most to describe Biden's performance, followed by "liar," "weak," "expected" and "honest."

Hunter Biden saga dominates online debate

Data: NewsWhip; Table: Axios Visuals

The mainstream media turned away. But online, President Trump's charges about Hunter Biden were by far the dominant storyline about the final presidential debate, according to exclusive NewsWhip data provided to Axios.

  • Coverage of business dealings by Joe Biden's son — and pre-debate allegations by one of his former business associates, Tony Bobulinski — garnered more than twice as much online activity (likes, comments, shares) as the runner-up.
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
1 hour ago - Health

America's poor health is jeopardizing its future

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

From high levels of obesity and opioid addiction to inequities in access to care, America's pre-existing conditions make the country an easy target for COVID-19, as well as future pandemics that could cripple the United States for decades to come.

Why it matters: One of the best ways the country could prepare for future threats — and boost its economy — is to improve Americans' overall health.

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