Apr 16, 2017

The gender gap in engineering and computer science

Computer science and engineering have become two of the most lucrative degrees in the U.S., but only a fraction of women are choosing to go into those fields of study. Instead, women are overwhelmingly represented in psychology, biology, and social science programs, according to new data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

Data: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Why this matters: The gender gap among the specific degrees within the "the sciences and engineering" field is actually much wider than universities might let on. It also illustrates the importance of examining why women are underrepresented in some fields and how to address that.

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Women take the lead on donating to support female college sports

The Indiana Hoosiers celebrate after the NCAA Women's College Basketball game. Photo: Bobby Goddin/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former female athletes are donating millions of dollars to build facilities, endow scholarships and support coaching positions at their alma maters, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Participation in women’s college sports teams is at an all time high, outnumbering men's sports for more than 20 years. And yet, the marketing and sponsorships from benefactors for college female teams has caught on slower than men's sports.

Go deeperArrowDec 25, 2019

Women won't see equal pay for another 257 years, report says

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Women around the world aren't expected to see equal pay until 2277 at the current rate of change, according to findings from the Global Gender Gap Report 2020, which measured the gender gap from 153 countries across economics, politics, education and health.

The big picture: Though the report says that women in the U.S. are "relatively well-represented" in high management roles, the global economic gender gap is expected to widen for several reasons: Women are highly represented in jobs being displaced by automation, aren't entering professions with high wage growth and spend more time than men in caretaker and volunteer roles.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019

Why 50+ women care about 2020

Data: AARP/Harris Poll; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new AARP survey by the Harris Poll examined what's driving women 50 and older ahead of next year's elections and found health care on top. The survey also found that older women’s concerns about Trump are eroding, but not upending, his support with Republicans and independents.

Why it matters: As the House of Representatives prepares to impeach the president, the priorities for this group of high-propensity voters are closer to home and different from what their male counterparts care most about.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019