Carolyn Kaster / AP

Trump on Comey: "infuriated" ... "white hot" ... "enraged ... fuming about Russia" ... "impatient with what he viewed as his sanctimony" ... "There was 'something wrong with' Mr. Comey, he told aides."

Blows massive hole in White House account — WashPost's Philip Rucker, Ashley Parker, Sari Horwitz and Robert Costa: Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein "threatened to resign after the narrative emerging from the White House on Tuesday evening cast him as a prime mover of the decision to fire Comey and that the president acted only on his recommendation."

Wall Street Journal's Shane Harris and Carol Lee: "Comey started receiving daily instead of weekly updates on the investigation, beginning at least three weeks ago ... Comey was concerned by information showing possible evidence of collusion."

WashPost: "Within the Justice Department and the FBI, the firing of Comey has left raw anger, and some fear ... Trump had 'essentially declared war on a lot of people at the FBI' one official said. 'I think there will be a concerted effort to respond over time in kind.'"

Key Republicans agree the firing intensified the investigations ... From an L.A. Times analysis, "By firing Comey, Trump may have fanned the flames he hoped to control," by David Lauter:

"In an email lament circulated among prominent Republicans, A.B. Culvahouse Jr., former Reagan White House counsel and head of Trump's vice presidential search effort, said the firing 'both prolongs the FBI/DOJ investigation and undermines the credibility of the Trump campaign's denials of no conspiracy with Putin.' 'We could be talking about Russian hacking in the mid-terms at this rate.'"

N.Y. Times' Matthew Rosenberg and Matt Apuzzo: "Comey's firing appears to have imbued the Senate Intelligence Committee with a renewed sense of urgency."

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Harris previews dual role in debut speech: Attacking Trump and humanizing Biden

Sen. Kamala Harris began her first speech as Joe Biden's running mate excoriating President Trump for his "mismanagement" of the coronavirus and scorn for the racial justice movement, before quickly pivoting to how she came to know Biden: through her friendship with his late son Beau.

Why it matters: The debut speech on Wednesday underscored the dual roles that Harris will take on for the rest of the campaign — humanizing Biden during a moment of national crisis and "prosecuting" the case against Trump as a failed president.

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America's bungled political and social response to the coronavirus exists side-by-side with a record-breaking push to create a vaccine with U.S. companies and scientists at the center.

Why it matters: America's two-sided response serves as an X-ray of the country itself — still capable of world-beating feats at the high end, but increasingly struggling with what should be the simple business of governing itself.

Joe Biden introduces Kamala Harris in first joint appearance

Joe Biden formally introduced Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Wednesday, telling a socially distanced audience in a Wilmington, Del., gymnasium: "I have no doubt that I picked the right person to join me as the next vice president of the United States of America."

Why it matters: Harris is a historic pick for vice president, becoming the first Black woman and first South Asian woman to be named to a major-party U.S. presidential ticket. "Kamala knows how to govern," Biden said. "She knows how to make the hard calls. She is ready to do this job on day one."