Lazaro Gamio / Axios

One of the casualties of the first six months of the Trump presidency is a common understanding of what is normal in our politics. It's easy to grow numb to abnormal actions, words and tactics.

But even our readers who love or feel loyalty to Trump need to remember that it's just not normal.

Why it matters: We're getting inured to the daily whirlwind. Each day's jaw drop or outrage seems to be topped by tomorrow's. Keep your head, even if all about you are losing theirs.

  1. It's not normal for the presumptive nominee's son to take a meeting with a Russian lawyer who claims she has dirt compiled by Russian governmental forces who want to see your guy win.
  2. It's not normal for the President to sign off on a public cover-up of that meeting when confronted with the facts.
  3. It's not normal for the President to hold a Cabinet meeting that consists of his staff gushing over him.
  4. It's not normal for the President to undermine his West Wing staff by continually asking friends and visitors for their opinions on various replacement options.
  5. It's not normal for the President to make a deal with his Russian counterpart for an "impenetrable Cyber Security unit," let his Treasury Secretary out on a Sunday show to enthusiastically defend the idea, then pull the plug that night after ridicule from fellow Republicans.
  6. It's not normal for the President to interrupt his day to watch the press briefing on TV, and critiquing the answers à la "SportsCenter."
  7. It's not normal for the President to obsess about cable-news coverage of himself, and instantly react to stories before checking the specifics.
  8. It's not normal for the President to irritate and offend key allies by failing to re-articulate the country's devotion to their alliance, only to offer the reassurance weeks later, after the damage is done.
  9. It's not normal for the President to publicly criticize the mayor of London on the basis of flawed facts, right after a terror attack that killed seven.
  10. It's not normal for the President to attack TV news hosts by name, including a personal attack on a woman's intellect and appearance.

Go deeper

New Jersey governor allows schools to reopen for in-person learning

Gov. Phil Murphy in December 2019. Phoot: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy (D) announced Wednesday he will sign an executive order allowing private and public K-12 schools and universities to reopen for in-person learning in September.

The big picture: New York and New Jersey have now authorized school districts to begin reopening. Both states and Connecticut ordered travelers from 31 states to quarantine before crossing their state borders after they were able to manage the pandemic.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 20,412,501 — Total deaths: 744,649— Total recoveries: 12,629,465Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 5,163,509 — Total deaths: 164,994 — Total recoveries: 1,714,960 — Total tests: 63,252,257Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi on state of coronavirus stimulus talks: "It's a chasm"
  4. Business: U.S. already feeling effects of ending unemployment benefits.
  5. Public health: America is flying blind on its coronavirus response.
  6. Education: Gallup: America's confidence in public school system jumps to highest level since 2004.

Pelosi on state of coronavirus stimulus talks: "It's a chasm"

Democrats and the Trump administration remain "miles apart" on negotiations over a coronavirus stimulus deal, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said on Wednesday.

Driving the news, via Axios' Dion Rabouin: Congress' failure to renew enhanced unemployment measures for millions of Americans at the end of July is already affecting consumer spending patterns, holding down retail purchases and foot traffic, economists at Deutsche Bank say.