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Expand chart
Data: U.S. Customs and Border Protection drug seizures for fiscal years; Note: 2018 figures reflect Oct. 1, 2017 - Aug. 31, 2018. Fentanyl figures for ports of entry reflect Oct. 1, 2017 - July 31, 2018; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

As the nation's opioid crisis rages on, the majority of the two biggest killers — heroin and fentanyl — illegally enter the U.S. from other countries, enmeshing the opioid epidemic with the highly politicized fight over border security.

Between the lines: Building a wall wouldn't do much to stop opioid smuggling through legal ports of entry, but there's a more bipartisan effort under way to improve interdiction capacity at the border.

The big picture: Most heroin seized in the U.S. comes from Mexico, according to a 2018 Drug Enforcement Administration report.

  • While fentanyl exported from China is more pure than Mexican fentanyl, the U.S. seizes higher quantities of Mexican fentanyl. There's also evidence that Mexican traffickers order fentanyl from China and smuggle it into the U.S. themselves.
  • Some opioids – especially fentanyl from China – come into the U.S. through the international mail system, but most drug smuggling attempts occur at and between southwest entry points.

Most opioids are seized at legal ports of entry, suggesting that, at the very least, a border wall alone won't stop drug traffickers supplying the nation's heroin and fentanyl.

  • "It helps, but it’s not a complete answer by any means," Republican Sen. John Cornyn said last month. “People go over walls, under walls, through walls. That’s why really it needs to be technology, infrastructure and personnel" as well.
  • “115% more fentanyl was seized at the border in the points of entry...from ’17 to ’18," said GOP Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, chair of the subcommittee responsible for Department of Homeland Security funding. "So part of border security are the sensors and the technologies to be able to detect."

Democrats also support better anti-drug technology at the border, while opposing a wall.

  • "A wall won’t stop fentanyl but scanning devices and more customs officers will," Democratic Whip Dick Durbin tweeted.

Where it stands: The Senate's Homeland Security spending bill included funding to enhance drug detection technologies, modernize Customs and Border Patrol infrastructure and expand the number of agents dedicated to opioid trafficking enforcement.

Bonus: Marijuana seizures occur more often between ports of entry, and smugglers have come up with very creative ways to get drugs across the border.

  • These include launching marijuana bundles with cannons, moving vehicles over border fences using ramps or cranes, flying drones and digging tunnels, a Homeland Security Investigations official testified in May.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

Treasury begins dispersing $350 billion in COVID relief funding to states and localities

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. Treasury on Monday began giving state and local governments access to $350 billion in emergency funding from the American Rescue Plan, the department announced Monday.

Why it matters: Though the money is aimed at helping state, local, territorial and tribal governments recover from the pandemic's economic fallout, the administration will generally give them wide latitude on how they can use the funds.

Game developers break silence around salaries

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Developers are sharing their salaries on Twitter under the hashtag #GameDevPaidMe to encourage pay transparency in their industry.

The big picture: The hashtag started circulating last year, but has returned periodically as developers fight for better working conditions. Salary sharing is a way to equalize the field. By removing the secrecy, as well as the stigma, around discussing pay, workers have more power to advocate for themselves when negotiating salaries and raises.

2 hours ago - World

Jerusalem crisis: Hamas fires rockets, Israel begins military campaign

Palestinian protesters and an Israeli police officer near the Damascus Gate. Photo: Amir Levy/Getty Images

Days of tension in Jerusalem escalated into an exchange of fire on Monday, as Hamas fired dozens of rockets toward Israel and the Israeli military responded with strikes of its own and said it was preparing for a military operation that could last several days.

Why it matters: This is the first time Hamas has fired rockets at Jerusalem since 2014, and it's the most serious escalation between the Israelis and Palestinians in many months. It comes during the most sensitive days on the calendar — the last days of Ramadan and the Jerusalem Day commemoration on Monday — and as political crises roil both the Israeli and Palestinian governments.