California Gov. Gavin Newsom (L) and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton. Photos: Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images and Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Texas filed a lawsuit Monday asking the Supreme Court to overturn California's ban on state-funded travel to 11 states over their LGBTQ policies, arguing it is "infected with animus towards religion" and violates federal laws.

Why it matters: The case raises questions about whether the law prohibiting California government employees from traveling to states deemed to discriminate over gender identity or sexuality can stand.

The big picture: The other states on California's travel ban list are Alabama, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, the Carolinas, South Dakota, Tennessee and Iowa.

  • The travel ban was enacted in 2016 following the North Carolina "bathroom bill" limiting LGBTQ rights. Several states were added to the list in 2017 for permitting adoption agencies to bar same-sex couples from adopting children, including Texas.
  • There are exceptions to the ban, including litigation and California law enforcement, public health, welfare or safety protects of the requirement to comply with requests by the federal government to appear before committees.

What they're saying: California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said the state government is "reviewing the complaint," per Politico, which first reported the action. "In California, we have chosen not to use taxpayer money to support laws discriminating against the LGBTQ community," Becerra added.

Read the complaint:

Go deeper: Supreme Court set to weigh in on 2020's most polarizing issues

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Big Tech's Hong Kong bind

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Big Tech companies are scrambling to figure out what China's imposition of a new national security law in Hong Kong means for their businesses there.

The big picture: Tech companies, like other multinationals, had long seen bases in Hong Kong as a way to operate close to China without being subject to many of that country's most stringent laws. Now they likely must choose between accepting onerous data-sharing and censorship requirements, or leaving Hong Kong.

2020 could decide fate of Keystone and Dakota Access pipelines

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Two new court actions — one by the Supreme Court and another by a federal judge — together highlight and raise the energy stakes of November's election.

Why it matters: The legal actions mean the results of the 2020 election could very well decide the fate of Keystone XL and Dakota Access, two projects at the heart of battles over fossil fuel infrastructure.

Updated 44 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 11,648,268 — Total deaths: 538,828 — Total recoveries — 6,328,930Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 2,938,750 — Total deaths: 130,310 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,032,329Map.
  3. Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index: Our response is becoming more polarized.
  4. Business: Rising cases pause U.S. economic recovery — Hospitals, doctors are major recipients of PPP loans.