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Poll station workers receive voting machines, registration paper and disinfection products on Nov. 1 in Harris County, Texas. Photo: Zeng Jingning/China News Service via Getty Images

The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals denied late Monday a Republican effort to block drive-through voting in Harris Country, Texas, on Election Day.

Where it stands: The county will allow one drive-through voting at only one location on Election Day — instead of 10 — to stay fully within state code that allows the practice in "buildings," as the other centers were in tents, according to county clerk Chris Hollins.

The state of play: The appeals court ruling came after a federal district judge rejected a similar GOP request to invalidate 127,000 ballots that had already been cast via drive-through voting stations across the county.

  • The Texas Supreme Court also denied an effort by Republicans to toss out the drive-through votes.
  • Republicans argued that Harris County had violated state law by setting up drive-through voting sites, which they claimed favored Democrats, according to the New York Times.
  • Curbside voting is allowed under state law for voters who are sick or disabled. The Republicans argued that "a voter’s general fear or lack of immunity from COVID-19 is not a 'disability' as defined by the Election Code," and thus the pandemic should not be an excuse for drive-through voting.

Between the lines: Harris County, which includes the city of Houston, is the most populous county in Texas and voted for Hillary Clinton over President Trump by 160,000 ballots in 2016, according to Bloomberg.

  • Texas, which hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976, has been rated a toss-up by the Cook Political Report. Joe Biden securing the state's 38 electoral votes would virtually guarantee his path to the White House.

The big picture: Dozens of lawsuits related to voting rights continue to be litigated all over the country, as Republicans sue to block efforts to expand voting access — such as extending mail-in ballot deadlines — that have been instituted during the pandemic.

Editor's note: The item and headline have been corrected to reflect the fact that the appeals court ruling only addressed whether drive-through voting centers should remain open (not whether the votes previously cast by drive-through voting should be invalidated).

Go deeper

Updated Nov 30, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Wisconsin, Arizona certify Biden's victories

Photo: Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Arizona and Wisconsin officials confirmed the presidential election results in their states, formalizing President-elect Joe Biden's victories in the key battlegrounds.

Why it matters: The moves deal yet another blow to President Trump's efforts to block or delay certification in key swing states that he lost. 

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The "war on nature"

A resident stands on his roof as the Blue Ridge Fire burned back in October in Chino Hills, Calif. Photo: Jae C. Hong/AP

Apocalyptic weather is the new normal because humans are "waging war on nature," the UN declared on Wednesday.

What they're saying: "The state of the planet is broken," said UN Secretary-General António Guterres, reports AP. “This is suicidal.”

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Health: Nursing homes are still getting pummeledU.S. could hit herd immunity by end of summer 2021 if Americans embrace virus vaccines, Fauci says.
  2. Politics: Pelosi, Schumer call on McConnell to adopt bipartisan $900B stimulus framework.
  3. World: U.K. clears Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for mass rollout — Putin says Russia will begin large-scale vaccination next week.
  4. Business: Investors are finally starting to take their money out of safe-haven Treasuries.
  5. Sports: The end of COVID’s grip on sports may be in sight.