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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at Monday's State Department press conference. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary Mike Pompeo escalated the Trump administration’s maximum pressure campaign on Iran with his announcement that the State Department would add Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) to its Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) list on April 15.

Why it matters: The FTO designation builds on the existing web of U.S. penalties against the IRGC — which has spawned and backed countless proxies and militias in the Middle East and carried out or supported terrorist actions on several continents — and makes it even harder to do business with individuals or companies tied to the group.

Background: The past three U.S. administrations have used executive branch authorities to sanction the IRGC and its affiliates for involvement in Iran’s nuclear program, human rights violations, cyber-enabled rights crimes and terrorism.

What's new: As noted by President Trump, “This designation will be the first time that the United States has ever named a part of another government as a FTO. It underscores the fact that Iran’s actions are fundamentally different from those of other governments.”

  • To be added to the FTO list, a group must retain “the capability and intent to carry out” terror activities against U.S. persons or security interests — a threshold the IRGC meets.
  • An “FTO designation triggers a criminal prohibition on knowingly providing material support or resources to the designated organization,” according to a State Department fact sheet. Law enforcement stands to play a greater role in Washington’s efforts to deny Iran access to resources and funding.

What they’re saying: IRGC Commander Major General Mohammad-Ali Aziz-Jafari, Chief Justice Seyyed Ebrahim Raisi (a rumored successor to Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei), and other officials have denounced the move. Foreign Minister Mohammad-Javad Zarif has already threatened a reciprocal designation.

The bottom line: This move further stigmatizes the Guard Corps by putting them on equal footing with non-state Sunni jihadist groups and places the burden on the IRGC to change their behavior or live with the stigma — and penalties — of the FTO list.

Behnam Ben Taleblu is a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

The dark new reality in Congress

National Guard troops keep watch at security fencing. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

This is how bad things are for elected officials and others working in a post-insurrection Congress:

  • Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.) said she had a panic attack while grocery shopping back home.
  • Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said police may also have to be at his constituent meetings.
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) told a podcaster he brought a gun to his office on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 because he anticipated trouble with the proceedings that day.