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Bhawani Singh, an engineer, works from his home in Delhi. Photo: Amarjeet Kumar Singh/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

The prolonging of remote work is hurting economies in India, Mexico, Turkey, Peru and beyond.

The big picture: These emerging nations have a smaller share of jobs that can be done remotely than the U.S. or Europe.

  • Around 37% of all jobs in America can be done from home. That jumps to 45% or more when looking just at megacities like New York, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.
  • In Sweden and the United Kingdom, it's 40%, reports the BBC.
  • But in Mexico and Turkey, it's fewer than 25%

What's happening: Less than half of the world's population has a computer at home, and only around 60% has access to the internet. That means the same jobs that can be done from home in New York or London might not be telework-friendly in other cities.

  • Case in point: "An accountant in the U.S. is going to use technology very easily, and she has no problem whatsoever working from home,” Era Dabla-Norris, an economist at the International Monetary Fund, tells the BBC. “An accountant in a smaller city in India may be using a pen and paper, and have a ledger instead of a computer.”

Go deeper with this map of where the remote jobs are in the U.S.

Go deeper

Amy Harder, author of Generate
Jul 20, 2020 - Energy & Environment
Column / Harder Line

Biden's climate plan tries to bring unions into clean energy

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden’s latest climate change and clean energy plan mentions the word union more than it does the climate itself.

Why it matters: Wind and solar energy have grown immensely across America over the last decade, but associated union jobs have not. The Democrats’ presumptive presidential nominee is trying to change that, which politicians and others say is key to tackling climate change.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.