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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Tulsa, Oklahoma, at sunrise. Photo: Jumping Rocks/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

If you're going to be working remotely for the foreseeable future and want to save some money on rent, you could move to Tulsa — and get paid $10,000 to do so.

Why it matters: Tulsa Remote — the Kaiser Family Foundation-funded program that's offering this perk to teleworkers — is a prime example of smaller cities attempting to leverage remote work to draw in talented professionals from the big, coastal metros.

Background: Tulsa Remote launched well before the onset of the pandemic, in 2018, but has seen a spike in applications this year, says urbanist Richard Florida, who served as a consultant for the program.

Here are the rules: You must be a full-time remote worker over the age of 18 and commit to living in Tulsa for at least a year.

  • Of the 400 people who've moved to the city since the program launched in 2018, only three have left, CNN Business reports.
  • 100 more new residents will have settled in by the end of 2020.

Tulsa Remote's target demographic is "people who are at the family formation stage and for whom trying to make a life in New York or Washington or San Francisco has become incredibly expensive," Florida says.

  • The program is also attempting to diversify Tulsa by pulling in residents of different races, ethnicities and backgrounds, he says.

Go deeper: Americans are moving again

Go deeper

Florida requiring proof of residency to get coronavirus vaccine

A man receives a COVID-19 vaccine from a health care worker at a drive-thru site at Tropical Park on Jan. 13 in Miami. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's surgeon general issued new guidelines on Thursday requiring people seeking COVID-19 vaccines to provide proof of permanent or seasonal residency.

Driving the news: Of the more than 1 million people who have received the first dose of the vaccine in Florida as of Wednesday, over 39,000 reside out of state, per data from the Florida Department of Health. The number and reports of out-of-state recipients have caused concern over what many have described as "vaccine tourism."

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.

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