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Photo: Artur Debat/Contributor, Getty

More than half (54%) of teens say they're worried that they're spending too much time with their devices, according to a new Pew Research Center report.

Why it matters: Americans, and young people in particular, are becoming more aware of the health, safety and productivity risks of being constantly connected. That's significant because more work, economy and lifestyle opportunities are moving online.

Addiction, by the numbers:

  • A majority (72%) of teens say they often or sometimes check for messages or notifications as soon as they wake up, according to the survey.
  • Roughly 40% of teens say they feel anxious when they do not have their cellphone with them.
  • In total, 56% of teens associate the absence of their cellphone with at least one of these three emotions: loneliness, being upset or feeling anxious.

Awareness around cellphone addiction is prompting a new push to detach people from their devices.

  • Over half (52%) of U.S. teens report taking steps to cut back on their mobile phone use, and the majority say they're trying to limit their use of social media or video game, per Pew.
  • And 57% of parents report setting screen time restrictions for their teen in one way or another.
  • Popular social media services, like Facebook and Instagram, have recently rolled out features to shows users how much time they are spending with each app.

Despite their concern, younger people are better than adults at managing the balance between their real and virtual lives. Parents are twice as likely to say they struggle to concentrate at work due to the distraction from their phones compared to students and their schoolwork.

The bottom line: Teens that grew up in the smartphone era have become addicted to their devices, but at least are aware of the fact that they've become hooked, which is prompting efforts to create more healthy relationships between kids and their devices.

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

Pfizer CEO feels "liberated" after taking COVID vaccine

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla. Photo: "Axios on HBO"

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla tells "Axios on HBO" that he recently received his first of two doses of the company's coronavirus vaccine.

Why it matters: Bourla told CNBC in December that company polling found that one of the most effective ways to increase confidence in the vaccine was to have the CEO take it.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Ripple CEO: SEC lawsuit is "bad for crypto" in the U.S.

Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse tells "Axios on HBO" that if his company loses a lawsuit brought by U.S. regulators, it would put the country at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to cryptocurrencies.

Between the lines: The SEC in December sued Ripple, and Garlinghouse personally, for allegedly selling over $1.3 billion in unregistered securities. Ripple's response is that its cryptocurrency, called XRP, didn't require registration because it's an asset rather than a security.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
2 hours ago - Health

Pfizer CEO: "It will be terrible" if COVID-19 vaccine prices limit access

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla told "Axios on HBO" that it "will be terrible for society" if the price of coronavirus vaccines ever prohibits some people from taking them.

Why it matters: Widespread uptake of the vaccine — which might require annual booster shots — will reduce the risk of the virus continuing to spread and mutate, but it's unclear who will pay for future shots or how much they'll cost.

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