Feb 6, 2017

Tech workers gear up for anti-Trump rallies

AP File

More than 1,200 tech employees from around the Bay Area have pledged to walk off their jobs at noon on Tuesday, March 14 (Pi day, for fellow nerds out there) to attend a rally at Palo Alto City Hall. Another 8,300 people have expressed interest in the so-called "Tech Stands Up" movement via a Facebook page.

Similar rallies are now being organized in Los Angeles and Austin, where the big tech conference SXSW will be in full force on March 14. Tech workers from Denver and New York have also reached out to the Tech Stands Up organizers to expand the effort. So far, employees from Facebook, Apple, Tesla, Microsoft and Google are among those participating.

Who's behind it: Brad Taylor, a 37-year-old software engineer for San Francisco-based startup Optimizely created Tech Stands Up out of frustration after tech leaders' timid responses to Trump's travel ban. "I was sick of the silence," he told Axios, adding that a large number of his engineering friends who work at flagship tech companies were upset by their boss' reactions. Last week, the morning before Trump signed the executive order, he fired off an angry email to a group of friends. It caught fire after that, reflecting what he thinks is a unified frustration seeping through the rank-and-file of the tech industry.

Why it matters: Tech CEOs are feeling intense pressure from their employees to use their positions of influence to to speak about against Trump administration policies that clash with Silicon Valley ideals. Over the past week, multiple CEOs have sharply criticized Trump's immigration policy, and last night dozens of tech companies filed a legal brief opposing the travel ban, saying it inflicts "substantial harm on U.S. companies." Taylor said he thinks the "tide has started to turn" as the industry becomes more vocal.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 665,164 — Total deaths: 30,852 — Total recoveries: 140,225.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 124,665 — Total deaths: 2,191 — Total recoveries: 1,095.
  3. Federal government latest: President Trump announces new travel advisories for New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, but rules out quarantine enforcement. Per the CDC, residents of those states must now "refrain from non-essential domestic travel for 14 days," with the exception of critical infrastructure industry workers.
  4. State updates: Alaska is latest state to issue a stay-at-home order — New York is trying to nearly triple its hospital capacity in less than a month and has moved its presidential primary to June 23. Some Midwestern swing voters who backed Trump's handling of the virus less than two weeks ago are balking at his call for the U.S. to be "opened up" by Easter.
  5. World updates: In Spain, over 1,400 people were confirmed dead between Thursday to Saturday.
  6. 🚀 Space updates: OneWeb filed for bankruptcy amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.
  7. Hollywood: Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson have returned to U.S. after being treated for coronavirus.
  8. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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Coronavirus updates: Global death toll tops 30,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

The novel coronavirus has now killed more than 30,000 people around the world — with Italy reporting over 10,000 deaths, per Johns Hopkins data.

The big picture: The number of deaths from COVID-19 in the U.S. surpassed 2,000 on Saturday. The United States leads the world in confirmed coronavirus infections — more than 124,000 by early Sunday. The number of those recovered from the virus in the U.S. passed the 1,000-mark on Saturday evening.

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Gilead expands access to experimental coronavirus drug in emergency cases

Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Gilead Sciences CEO Daniel O’Day said in an open letter Saturday the company is expanding access to its experimental anti-coronavirus drug remdesivir to include severely ill COVID-19 patients.

The big pig picture: President Trump has called the antiviral drug "promising," but the results of six clinical trials on this investigational medicine are still being conducted, so its effectiveness the treatment of the novel coronavirus has yet to be proved. The World Health Organization is involved in the tests.

Go deeperArrow3 hours ago - Health