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John Doerr, John Chambers; Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

For the past 20 years, Cisco Chairman John Chambers and Kleiner Perkins Chairman John Doerr have been bringing tech execs to Washington to meet with government officials about the issues Silicon Valley cares about, like corporate tax reform, high-skilled immigration and science education.

The biggest game-changer over the past two decades? Trump.

Between the lines: Despite the tech industry's overall skeptical view of Trump, two longtime Silicon Valley leaders see positive momentum for driving pro-business policies that will spur startup investment and, most of all, jobs.

"We realize we have to change — I think Republicans and Democrats know it. And we've finally got somebody who's going to be bold and go for it.... We've been through three presidencies in the past 20 years trying to get corporate tax rate changes. At least we're starting to move. The scary part is our counterparts around the world are moving much faster." — John Chambers

Chambers and Doerr said they're most optimistic about:

  • Slashing corporate tax rates and bringing back overseas tax dollars
  • Infrastructure package that includes broadband expansion funding
  • High-skilled immigration that gives preference to foreign nationals who get advanced U.S. degrees in science or technology

Where there's still a lot of work to do:

  • Increasing computer science and technology education for K-12 students
  • Startup-friendly policies that help more entrepreneurs get funded and go public to drive GDP growth and jobs.
  • Modernizing government

Startups will be the major source of job growth. Generating 25-30 million jobs over the next 10 years will require 300-500 IPOs on the Nasdaq alone, Chambers said. Last year, there were only 90. "It's doable, but only if you get the startup engine moving dramatically faster," he said.

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
11 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Why Trump may still fire Barr

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Attorney General Barr may be fired or resign, as President Trump seethes about Barr's statement this week that no widespread voter fraud has been found.

Behind the scenes: A source familiar with the president's thinking tells Axios that Trump remains frustrated with what he sees as the lack of a vigorous investigation into his election conspiracy theories.

Mike Allen, author of AM
11 mins ago - World

Scoop: Trump's spy chief plans dire China warning

Xi Jinping reviews troops during a military parade in Beijing last year. Photo: Thomas Peter/Reuters

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe on Thursday will publicly warn that China's threat to the U.S. is a defining issue of our time, a senior administration official tells Axios.

Why it matters: It's exceedingly rare for the head of the U.S. intelligence community to make public accusations about a rival power.

Ina Fried, author of Login
31 mins ago - Technology

Tech's race problem is all about power

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As problematic as the tech industry's diversity statistics are, activists say the focus on those numbers overlooks a more fundamental problem — one less about numbers than about power.

What they're saying: In tech, they argue, decision-making power remains largely concentrated in the hands of white men. The result is an industry whose products and working conditions belie the industry rhetoric about changing the world for the better.