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Steve Rhodes / Flickr cc

Tech execs are donating millions to organizations that are challenging Trump's executive order and helping immigrants remain in the U.S. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in particular is receiving a lot of Silicon Valley love — racking up over $24 million in online donations over the weekend.

Below is a growing list of the company execs giving big to the ACLU. For more visit TechCrunch's in-depth article:

Giving millions

Google is donating an initial $2 million for a crisis fund that can be matched with up to $2 million in donations from employees. The money will go to the American Civil Liberties Union, the Immigrant Legal Resource Center, the International Rescue Committee and the U.N. Human Rights Commission. Google execs will also donate separately to the effort.

Lyft said it would said it would donate $1 million to ACLU over the next four years.

Giving $150k

Chris Sacca, venture capitalist and early investor in companies like Twitter and Uber, announced his donations via Twitter: "The ACLU took Trump to court. Let's stand with them. Reply with donation receipts from today and I'll match to $25,000." As replies piled up, Sacca doubled and tripled his match offer, then said he was "matching my own match and giving $150,000."

Giving $50k

Trinity Ventures VC Ajay Chopra; Stripe CEO Patrick Collision; Charles River Ventures partner Izhar Armony; Xamarin co-founder Nat Friedman; Intercom CEO Eoghan McCabe; and Sequoia Capital's Mike Vernal are all matching up to $50k.

Giving $20-25k

Facebook's head of advertising Andrew Bosworth and Nest founder Tony Fadell will match $25k. Union Square Ventures partners Fred Wilson, Joanne Wilson, Amy Batchelor and Brad Feld are matching $20k.

Giving $10k or less

Ziggeo CEO Susan Danziger and USV partner Albert Wenger; Homebrew Venture partners Hunter Walk and Satya Patel; and Slack CEO Steward Butterfield will match $10k.

Separately, Uber said it would create a $3 million defense fund to cover legal, immigration and translation costs for drivers affected by the ban

Go deeper

CPAC Republicans choose conservatism over constituents

Rep. Matt Gaetz. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images

CPAC proved such a draw, conservative Republicans chose the conference over their constituents.

Why it matters: More than a dozen House Republicans voted by proxy on the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill in Washington so they could speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC. And Sen. Ted Cruz skipped an Air Force One flight as President Biden flew to Cruz's hometown of Houston to survey storm damage.

Border Democrat warns Biden about immigrant fallout

Henry Cuellar (right). Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images

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Why it matters: Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Texas) told Axios he supports President Biden. But the moderate said he sees the downsides of efforts to placate pro-immigrant groups, an effort that threatens to blow up on the administration.

In CPAC speech, Trump says he won't start a 3rd party

Trump at CPAC on Feb. 28 in Orlando, Florida. Photo: Courtesy of C-SPAN.

In his first public speech since leaving office, former President Trump told the audience at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) that he would not start a third party because "we have the Republican party."

Why it matters: The former president aims to cement himself as Republicans' "presumptive 2024 nominee" as his top contenders — including former members of his administration — face the challenge of running against the GOP's most popular politician.