Taylor Swift at the Sundance premiere of Netflix's "Miss Americana." Photo: Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Taylor Swift says in a forthcoming Netflix documentary that she wishes she commented on politics for the first time in 2016 to help defeat President Trump, rather than breaking her silence ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, per The Daily Beast.

What happened: A pivotal scene in "Miss Americana" shows Swift holed up with her family and public relations staff, preparing to endorse Democrat Phil Bredesen for Senate in Tennessee on Instagram. Told that the move might prompt the public to think she's simultaneously condemning the president, Swift responds, "I don’t care if they write that. I'm sad I didn't say it two years ago."

  • Her publicist also warns her that Trump could personally come after her — to which Swift responds, "F--k that. I don't care."

The big picture: Swift's Instagram endorsement of Bredesen, who eventually lost the race, called out his Republican opponent, Sen. Marsha Blackburn, for voting against reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act and refusing to support same-sex marriage.

  • In the documentary, Swift rails on Blackburn: "I can't see another commercial [with] her disguising these policies behind the words 'Tennessee Christian values. I live in Tennessee. I am Christian. That's not what we stand for."
  • She also calls her "Trump in a wig."

Flashback: Swift cites the backlash to the Dixie Chicks' decision to speak out against former President George W. Bush in 2004 as a reason for why she kept silent on politics for so long.

  • "My moral code as a kid and now was the need to be thought of as good. Overall, the main thing I always strived to be was, like, a good girl," she says to open the documentary.

Go deeper: Taylor Swift explains why she didn't endorse Hillary Clinton in 2016

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Americans and U.S. companies will be banned from making transactions with ByteDance, the Chinese owner of TikTok, in 45 days, according to a new executive order President Trump issued Thursday evening.

The big picture: Last week Trump announced his intention to ban TikTok but said he'd leave a 45-day period for Microsoft or other U.S.-based suitors to try to close a deal to acquire the popular video-sharing app.

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Former U.S. Ambassador to Japan Bill Hagerty speaking at CPAC in 2019. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Former U.S. Ambassador to Japan Bill Hagerty won the Tennessee Republican Senate primary on Thursday evening, beating out surgeon Manny Sethi for GOP Sen. Lamar Alexander's seat, who announced his retirement in late 2018, AP reports.

Why it matters: Though the race narrowed in July, Hagerty — who received President Trump's endorsement in 2019 — stuck close to the president's messaging and touted his Tennessee roots.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 18,982,658 — Total deaths: 712,266— Total recoveries — 11,477,642Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 4,873,747 — Total deaths: 159,931 — Total recoveries: 1,598,624 — Total tests: 59,652,675Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi rips GOP over stimulus negotiations: "Perhaps you mistook them for somebody who gives a damn" — Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine tests positive.
  4. Public health: Majority of Americans say states reopened too quicklyFauci says task force will examine aerosolized spread.
  5. Business: The health care sector imploded in Q2More farmers are declaring bankruptcyJuly's jobs report could be an inflection point for the recovery.
  6. Sports: Where college football's biggest conferences stand on playing.