Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Axios on your phone

Get breaking news and scoops on the go with the Axios app.

Download for free.

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

People walking outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on June 10. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court threw out a lower court ruling on Monday that would have given companies and individuals broad scope in scraping information from online services.

Why it matters: In remanding the case between LinkedIn and hiQ back for further proceedings, the Supreme Court will give Microsoft, which owns LinkedIn, another chance to make the case that bulk collection of even publicly available data threatens individual privacy.

Catch up quick: LinkedIn argues that upstart rival hiQ shouldn't be able to scrape public profiles on its site to gather the vast amount of information it provides on people's work history and other business-related data.

  • A federal appeals had sided with hiQ, but Monday's ruling by the Supreme Court will send things back to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Between the lines: The legal question is how broadly to apply the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, which prohibits accessing a computer system without proper authorization.

My thought bubble: Technology has made questions around combining masses of public data a lot trickier.

  • "Public information" once meant you could access a particular record by visiting a government building.
  • Electronic databases have already changed the game, as has the emergence of data brokers who compile public records in new ways.
  • Mass scraping of data takes things a step further, enabling personal data to be combined, or even used to create and train algorithms. That's how Clearview is said to have used photos scraped from Facebook and Google to hone its facial recognition technology.

Go deeper: House antitrust bills take tight aim at tech giants

Go deeper

Senate confirms Ketanji Brown Jackson as judge on powerful appeals court

Jackson during her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in April. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images/POOL

The Senate voted 53-44 on Monday to confirm judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to serve on the powerful U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Why it matters: The court is often viewed as a stepping stone for the Supreme Court, and Jackson is considered a favorite to receive a nomination if a Supreme Court vacancy opens up. President Biden has promised to nominate the first Black woman to the Supreme Court.

McConnell: "Highly unlikely" he would allow Biden to fill Supreme Court vacancy in 2024

Mitch McConnell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told radio host Hugh Hewitt on Monday that it is "highly unlikely" a Supreme Court nominee picked by Biden would be confirmed in 2024 if Republicans take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: A record number of judges, plus three Supreme Court justices, were confirmed under Trump. Democrats have pledged to "restore the balance" of the courts.

Updated Jun 15, 2021 - Politics & Policy

DOJ asks Supreme Court to reinstate death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber

Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The Department of Justice on Monday night asked the Supreme Court to reinstate the death penalty for Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Why it matters: Biden is the first sitting president to publicly oppose the death penalty and has said he wants to end its use.