Mar 16, 2020 - Health

Supreme Court postpones oral arguments due to coronavirus concerns

Photo: Ting Shen/Xinhua via Getty

The Supreme Court announced Monday that it would postpone oral arguments for its March session because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Why it matters: It's a critical arm of the U.S. government shutting down as a response to the crisis.

  • Two of the nine justices, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer, are in their 80s.
  • The session was due to take place March 23–25 and March 30–April 1.
  • The Court stated in its press release it "will examine the options for rescheduling those cases in due course in light of the developing circumstances."

The big picture: It noted that postponing arguments "in light of public health concerns is not unprecedented," though it does mark the court's first postponement since the Spanish flu epidemic in 1918.

  • Among the delayed cases is President Trump’s lawsuit to prevent congressional committees and New York prosecutors to subpoena his financial records.
  • The development will also affect the $8 billion copyright feud between Google and Oracle.

Go deeper

The Supreme Court could be Trump's ACA nightmare

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Supreme Court’s next big Affordable Care Act case could be a huge political problem for President Trump.

Why it matters: The Trump administration will spend the next several months urging the court to strip away some 20 million people’s health insurance and to throw out protections for pre-existing conditions. And it may all come to a head just before Election Day.

Go deeperArrowMar 3, 2020 - Health

Chief Justice Roberts laments Chuck Schumer's “dangerous” comments

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts walks out of the Senate chamber on Feb. 5. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts issued a rare public rebuke on Wednesday of Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, who blasted Trump-appointed Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh as the court weighs its first major abortion case.

What's happening: The Supreme Court heard arguments on Wednesday over a Louisiana law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, as it considers a case that could revive abortion restrictions.

Schumer on Supreme Court remarks: "I should not have used the words I used"

Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer expressed regret on Thursday for comments he made about Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, following a rare public rebuke by Chief Justice John Roberts.

The backdrop: As the Supreme Court heard arguments on Wednesday for its first major abortion case since Kavanaugh was confirmed, Schumer warned the two conservative justices that "you won't know what hit you if you go forward with these awful decisions." Roberts responded that "threatening statements" from top public officials are "not only inappropriate," but also "dangerous."