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Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Friday said it would decide whether the Trump administration can exclude unauthorized immigrants from the 2020 census count, setting arguments for Nov. 30.

Why it matters: Civil rights groups fear that leaving undocumented people living in the U.S. out of the survey could lead to to an undercount, which would affect how House seats are reapportioned and how federal funding is distributed over the next 10 years.

The big picture: The move comes three days after the Supreme Court allowed the Trump administration to stop census field operations early while litigation over the once-a-decade count continues.

  • Lower courts previously ordered the Commerce Department to continue counting through Oct. 31, but the administration argued that the census must move to the data processing phase immediately to have time to meet an end-of-year deadline.
  • Local governments and civil rights groups sued over the plan to stop the count early, arguing the Trump administration was seeking to accommodate a July order from the president which would exclude unauthorized immigrants from the census.

Of note: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Trump's nominee to fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Supreme Court seat, could take part in the case if she is confirmed by then.

  • The U.S. has counted both citizens and noncitizens since its first survey in 1790.

What's next: The court is expected to rule between the end of this year and early January 2021, when the Trump administration must report census numbers to the House, per AP.

Go deeper: States would lose House seats if census excludes unauthorized immigrants

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 1: A premeditated lie lit the fire

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 1: Trump’s refusal to believe the election results was premeditated. He had heard about the “red mirage” — the likelihood that early vote counts would tip more Republican than the final tallies — and he decided to exploit it.

"Jared, you call the Murdochs! Jason, you call Sammon and Hemmer!”

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies.

The state of play: Biden also raised arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to a White House readout. The statement said Biden and Putin agreed maintain "consistent communication," and that Biden stressed the U.S. would "act firmly in defense of its national interests in response to actions by Russia that harm us or our allies."