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Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California, Texas and Florida would each lose at least one House seat they otherwise would have won if unauthorized immigrants were removed from the U.S. Census count this year, the Pew Research Center found.

Driving the news: The White House is looking to exclude this population, per a new policy announced this week. President Trump said he has discretion to decide who is considered an "inhabitant" of the U.S. for apportionment purposes.

By the numbers: If unauthorized immigrants were not included, California would have a net loss of two seats instead of one. Florida would gain one instead of two, and Texas would gain two instead of three.

  • Alabama, Minnesota and Ohio would each hold onto a seat that they would have lost if allotment were based only on total population change.

The state of play: The U.S. has counted both citizens and noncitizens since its first survey in 1790. It excludes foreign tourists and business travelers in the country temporarily.

  • The District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and U.S. Island area populations are also left out because they don't have voting representation in Congress.
  • Military and civilian federal employees stationed abroad and their dependents are counted if they provide their state address in employment records.

Flashback: Trump ordered the Census Bureau to assemble a separate database on the citizenship status of every U.S. resident after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against including a question about citizenship on the 2020 Census.

Go deeper

Why minority voter participation matters

Reproduced from the Pew Research Center; Chart: Axios Visuals

Legal barriers have contributed to limiting voter turnout among people of color. But if people of color voted at the rate of white voters, it would immediately alter who gets elected and what policies they pursue.

Why it matters: In the 2018 midterm elections, all major racial and ethnic groups saw a double-digit increase in their voter participation compared to the 2014 midterms, per the Pew Research Center.

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.