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Barrett is sworn in at her confirmation hearing. Photo: Kevin Dietsch - Pool/Getty Images

Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation process began this week, with Tuesday's hearing giving the Senate Judiciary Committee the opportunity to ask President Trump's nominee questions.

  1. Opening statement: Barrett tell Senate that courts "should not try" to make policy.
  2. Elections: Barrett declines to say whether a president can unilaterally delay election or whether she would recuse from 2020 election cases.
  3. Abortion: Barrett says she does not have a judicial "agenda" on abortion, declines to say whether Roe v. Wade was wrongly decided.
  4. Health care: Barrett says she's "not hostile" to the Affordable Care Act, defends past writings.
  5. Analysis: How Barrett would change the way the Supreme Court works.
  6. Strategy: What to expect from Democrats and Republicans at this week's hearings.

Go deeper

Jan 13, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Senate holding hearing for intel chief Friday

Avril Haines. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Republicans are heeding calls to protect national security, agreeing to hold a confirmation hearing Friday for Joe Biden's nominee for director of national intelligence.

Why it matters: The president-elect's transition team has argued swift confirmation hearings — especially for its national security nominees — are crucial following last week's attack on the Capitol, threats of violence surrounding next week's inauguration and global political tensions.

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

48 mins ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council Director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.

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