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Stone speaks after his arraignment Friday. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The indictment of Roger Stone has given us new insight into what special counsel Robert Mueller knows — and raised a lot of questions about the unnamed people and organizations listed in the indictment.

Between the lines: The biggest mystery focuses on the statement that "a senior Trump Campaign official was directed to contact Stone" about future Wikileaks dumps that would be damaging to Hillary Clinton. The vague passiveness of "was directed" has led to questions about whether it was President Trump who gave the order, as a reporter asked White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. But this falls under the category of things we just don't know yet.

Organization 1 refers to WikiLeaks, the organization led by Julian Assange. The indictment describes it as an organization which released "tens of thousands of documents stolen from the DNC and the personal email account of the chairman of the U.S. presidential campaign of Hillary Clinton."

  • A "reporter who had connections to a high-ranking Trump Campaign official," as described in the indictment, allegedly asked Stone about what WikiLeaks had on the Clinton campaign. The NYT reported at the end of last year that Breitbart political editor Matthew Boyle was involved in exchanges with Stone and former Trump aide Steve Bannon on the subject, and released emails some of which match the wording of the communications quoted in the indictment.
  • A "high-ranking Trump Campaign official" communicated with both the reporter and with Stone about the status of WikiLeaks' second release of emails. In the emails released by the New York Times, Steve Bannon was mentioned by both Stone and Boyle. Some of those emails were exactly quoted in the indictment, but for the withholding of Bannon and Assange's names.

Person 1 has been confirmed to be Jerome Corsi, a political commentator and author who is an associate of Trump and Stone. NBC News reported in November that Mueller had emails between Corsi and Stone discussing the timing for the WikiLeaks dump. Corsi has been in talks with the Mueller team for months, and in November rejected a plea deal.

Person 2 is described as "a radio host who had known STONE for more than a decade" and allegedly texted Stone about the timing of Wikileaks' release and the damage it would do to Hillary Clinton.

  • In November, NBC News released obtained text messages between comedian and radio show host Randy Credico and Stone regarding Assange’s plans to release Clinton campaign emails. The wording of some of the texts released by NBC News match those quoted in the indictment.
  • The indictment also indicates that Person 2 had the head of Wikileaks on his show on August 25. Credico interviewed Julian Assange on that day.

Go deeper: Roger Stone arrested after indictment in Mueller probe

Go deeper

Hundreds of corporations sign statement opposing restrictive voting bills

Former American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault. Photo: Earl Gibson III/WireImage)

Hundreds of companies and executives released a letter on Wednesday condemning legislation that restricts "any eligible voter from having an equal and fair opportunity to cast a ballot," per the New York Times.

Why it matters: It's the most concerted action yet by big business in opposition to GOP-sponsored bills at the state level that limit mail-in ballots, implement new voter ID requirements and slash registration options, among other measures.

51 mins ago - Axios Twin Cities

Brooklyn Center mayor in the spotlight after Daunte Wright shooting

Mike Elliott has moved swiftly after the death of Daunte Wright. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images)

The killing of Daunte Wright by a Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer has thrust Mayor Mike Elliott into the national spotlight.

The big picture: Elliott, with the backing of the city council, has acted quickly and boldly in the wake of the shooting. He fired longtime city manager Curt Boganey, took control of the police department and called for the firing of officer Kim Potter, who resigned on Tuesday.

Exclusive: White House meeting with members of Problem Solvers Caucus

Members of the Problem Solvers Caucus discuss the COVID-19 relief bill in December. Photo: Oliver Contreras/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Top White House officials will meet Wednesday with a bipartisan coalition of House lawmakers as the administration tries to enlist moderates to support the president's infrastructure proposal.

Why it matters: The meeting is something of an olive branch after President Biden's team courted groups of progressives to back the $2.2 trillion package.

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