Feb 12, 2018

Global markets could have "a much bigger shakeout coming"

Photo: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

"The world’s biggest hedge fund ... warned that global markets are entering a new era of volatility as the world adjusts to higher interest rates after a decade of ultra-loose monetary policy," the Financial Times reports on the front page.

Why it matters: After Wall Street's worst week in six years, the FT pointed over the weekend to "The end of an era of tranquility" and the beginning of "The age of instability."

  • Bob Prince, co-chief investment officer at Bridgewater, said last week’s turbulence is set to continue: "There had been a lot of complacency built up in markets over a long time, so we don't think this shakeout will be over in a matter of days. ... We'll probably have a much bigger shakeout coming."

P.S. "New Tax Law Haunts Companies That Did ‘Inversion’ Deals,'" per Wall Street Journal front-pager:

  • "Companies that engineered ... inversion deals ... have been able to reduce their tax rates and take certain deductions by shifting their tax homes to other nations. ... [P]rovisions in the new tax code restrict some of those deductions."

Go deeper

Trump's big, empty beef with Twitter

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump finally acted on his now year-old threat to take action against social media platforms for alleged bias against conservatives. But so far, according to experts in both government and the industry, the threat looks mostly empty.

Driving the news: Trump escalated his war on Twitter Friday morning, tweeting repeatedly that the company needs to be regulated after it overnight added a warning label to a tweet of his calling for the military to start shooting looters, which violated Twitter’s rules against glorifying violence.

In photos: Protests over George Floyd's death grip Minneapolis

The Third Police Precinct burns in Minneapolis on Thursday night. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Demonstrators demanding justice burned a Minneapolis police station and took control of the streets around it last night, heaving wood onto the flames, kicking down poles with surveillance cameras and torching surrounding stores.

What's happening: The crowd was protesting the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man whose life was snuffed out Tuesday by a white Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on his neck for about eight minutes.

Minneapolis mayor to Trump: “Weakness is pointing your finger” during a crisis

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey fired back at President Trump on Friday, after the president accused the mayor of weak leadership amid violence sparked by the killing of an unarmed black man by a white police officer.

Driving the news: Trump made his accusations in a pair of tweets early Friday, saying he would bring the national guard into Minneapolis if Frey couldn't “bring the City under control.”