Updated Feb 24, 2020 - Economy & Business

Stocks fall more than 3% as coronavirus cases spike

Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Wall Street had its worst day in two years on Monday, following a spike in coronavirus cases in South Korea and Italy. The S&P 500 fell 3.3%, the Nasdaq Composite fell 3.7% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average sunk 1,030 points (3.5%).

The big picture: This is the U.S. stock market's biggest reaction thus far to the coronavirus, largely shrugging it off as a threat to the global economy (though the bond market has not). While the S&P is down from record highs — which it notched last week — the index is still above lows touched earlier this year.

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Data: FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

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Wall Street sees 2nd day of brutal sell-off

Photo: Johannes Eisele/AF via Getty Images

The stock market fell another 3% on Tuesday, following Monday’s sell-off. Bond yields touched record lows.

The big picture: Stocks continued to fall as the CDC said it expects the coronavirus to spread in the U.S. The Dow and S&P are more than 7% below the record highs seen earlier this month.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 25, 2020 - Economy & Business

Stocks fall 4% as sell-off worsens

A trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Stocks fell more than 4% on Thursday, extending the market’s worst week since the financial crisis in 2008 following a spike in coronavirus cases around the world.

The big picture: All three indices are in correction, down over 10% from recent record-highs, amid a global market rout. It's the S&P 500's quickest decline into correction territory in the index's history, per Deutsche Bank.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 27, 2020 - Economy & Business

Stocks drop 4% to end worst week since 2008

Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Stocks closed more than 4% lower on Friday, with the S&P 500 shedding 4.3%, the Dow dropping 4.6% (or 927 points), and the Nasdaq falling 3.7%.

Why it matters: It caps a bruising week for Wall Street — you'd have to go back to 2008 to see worse losses — as the coronavirus outbreak forces more of the world's biggest economies to shut down.