Photo: Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

At least 22 states and Washington, D.C., are building up stores of the anti-malarial drug President Trump previously touted as a possible solution for the novel coronavirus, AP reports.

Why it matters: The Food and Drug Administration advised doctors Friday against prescribing hydroxychloroquine or the related drug chloroquine to coronavirus patients as it appears to be causing some serious and potentially life-threatening side effects.

  • 'The warning comes as doctors at a New York hospital published a report that heart rhythm abnormalities developed in most of 84 coronavirus patients treated with hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin, a combo Trump has promoted," AP notes.

What they're saying: "While clinical trials are ongoing to determine the safety and effectiveness of these drugs for COVID-19, there are known side effects of these medications that should be considered," FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said.

The state of play: Some health experts worry the public could misuse the drug if it is made more widely available.

  • Oklahoma spent $2 million acquiring the drugs.
  • Utah and Ohio spent hundreds of thousands of dollars, per AP.
  • New York, Connecticut, Oregon, Louisiana, North Carolina and Texas also received donations of the drug from Amneal Pharmaceutical, a private company in New Jersey.
  • Florida received 1 million doses from the Israeli company Teva Pharmaceutical.

Go deeper: Trump touts drugs not yet approved by FDA for treating coronavirus

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Updated Sep 25, 2020 - Health

World coronavirus updates

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Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

The number of deaths from COVID-19 surpassed 980,000 worldwide on Thursday.

By the numbers: Globally, more than 32 million million people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, Johns Hopkins data shows.

White House will require staff to undergo randomized coronavirus testing

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Staff in the Executive Office of the President will be subject to mandatory coronavirus tests, in efforts to "protect the health and safety of the entire White House Complex," CNBC reports.

  • Why it matters: Multiple people in the White House have tested positive for COVID-19 throughout the pandemic, including President Trump's national security adviser Robert O'Brien last week.

What they're saying: “As part of our ongoing efforts to protect the health and safety of the entire White House Complex, randomized testing of Executive Office of the President staff, which has been ongoing for several months, will become mandatory rather than voluntary," a White House official said Monday.

Aug 3, 2020 - Health

Former FDA chief: MLB virus outbreaks should be warning sign for schools

Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CNBC’s “Squawk Box" Monday that coronavirus outbreaks in the MLB, which declined to use the "bubble" strategy employed by the NBA, are "a warning of what could potentially happen if we aren't very careful with the schools."

Why it matters: Gottlieb's comments underscore questions about how schools, especially underfunded public schools, will be able to cope with reopening when a corporation with almost unlimited wealth is overwhelmed in a matter of days, as Axios' Shane Savitsky points out.