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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

In the wake of Democrats' Iowa disaster, the Nevada Democratic Party has abandoned the problematic app — and Wyoming Democratic Party officials tell Axios they will conduct a thorough run-through with their own technology ahead of their caucuses.

Why it matters: The technological failure in Iowa caucuses is becoming another nail in the coffin of the caucus system, which nearly a dozen states have ditched and replaced with primaries since 2016.

What to watch: Nevada and Wyoming are the only other two states that will hold traditional Democratic presidential caucuses this year, on Feb. 22 and April 4, respectively.

  • North Dakota also has a caucus, but it will be "firehouse style," allowing participants to cast ballots at certain locations over several hours — closer to a primary.

Nevada Democratic Party Chairman William McCurdy II announced on Tuesday that the party won't use the same app used by the Iowa caucus.

  • "We had already developed a series of backups and redundant reporting systems, and are currently evaluating the best path forward," he said in a statement.

In Wyoming, there are three ways for registered Democrats to participate in their caucus, including mailing in or dropping off ballots in person ahead of time.

  • "That gives us the added benefit of being able to iron out any problems that pop up before our actual caucus date," party spokesperson Nina Hebert told Axios.
  • The Department of Homeland Security claims to have offered to help test the Iowa Democratic Party's app. While the Wyoming party has yet to receive an offer, Herbert said the party "would certainly welcome any testing assistance from federal agencies that are experts in collecting voting."

Between the lines: There are broader issues with the caucus format, including the fact that the lengthy evening process can make it difficult for people who work at night or care for young children or older parents to participate. Because participants disclose their preferences in a group format, it also can deter those who want their vote to be private.

The big picture: Caucuses are on their way out. Per NPR's calendar, Democrats held caucuses in 14 states and five U.S. territories in 2016,

  • Then, in 2018, the Democratic National Committee encouraged state parties to use a primary system rather than caucuses.
  • It also passed sweeping rule changes that stripped superdelegate powers and encouraged state parties to make their primaries and caucuses more accessible.

"After the 2016 election, Maine had the foresight to improve their process for choosing the Democratic nominee," Maine Democratic Party spokesperson Seth Nelson told Axios.

  • Primaries allow more people to participate in the selection of the Democratic nominee by not restricting participants to a certain time or place, Nelson said.

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - World

Up to 17 U.S. missionaries kidnapped in Haiti

Haitian soldiers guard the public prosecutor's office in Port-au-Prince this month. Photo: Richard Pierrin/AFP via Getty Images

Children were among up to 17 American Christian missionaries and their relatives kidnapped by a gang in Haiti on Saturday, the New York Times first reported.

The latest: Haitian police inspector Frantz Champagne identified the 400 Mawozo gang as the group responsible, in a statement to AP.

Hollywood union reaches deal with studios to avert strike

Photo: AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images

A Hollywood workers' union reached a tentative deal with studios, networks and streamers that will guarantee better working conditions, meal breaks and increased wages for low-paid workers, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) announced Saturday night.

Why it matters: The deal, which still needs to be ratified by IATSE members, will avert a nationwide strike by film and television workers that was set to start Monday. It would have been the first strike in the union's 128-year history.

Bill Clinton released from hospital following treatment for non-COVID infection

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Former President Bill Clinton was discharged from the University of California, Irvine Medical Center on Sunday, nearly a week after he was admitted for a non-COVID-related infection, according to his spokesperson Angel Ureña.

What they're saying: "His fever and white blood cell count are normalized and he will return home to New York to finish his course of antibiotics," wrote Dr. Alpesh Amin, who has been overseeing the team of doctors treating Clinton. "On behalf of everyone at UC Irvine Medical Center, we were honored to have treated him and will continue to monitor his progress."

Worth noting: Clinton had a urinary tract infection that spread to his bloodstream, per CNN.

  • The California-based medical team had been administering IV antibiotics and fluids, and was in constant communication with Clinton's New York team, including his cardiologist, according to the former president's physicians.
  • President Biden spoke by phone with Clinton on Friday to see how he was doing, and the catch-up included a discussion of recent politics.