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Trump supporters march around the Michigan State Capitol Building in protest. Photo: Matthew Hatcher via Getty Images

Statehouses have beefed up security, closed to the public and asked state employees to work from home, multiple state officials tell Axios.

Why it matters: Unrest broke out in several state capitals on Wednesday, but even places with peaceful protests have been forced to take extra precaution in the waning days of Trump's presidency.

  • New Mexico, Oregon and California saw some of the most aggressive actions from protestors on Wednesday. New Mexico's lawmakers were forced to evacuate and meet virtually, 11 Sacramento protestors were arrested and an unlawful assembly was declared in Salem.
  • On Thursday, the Michigan State House had to be evacuated for two hours because of a bomb threat.
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Driving the news: States are continuing to take security precautions after Wednesday's multi-state disorder. New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu canceled his in-person swearing in ceremony originally scheduled Thursday, in part because of protests.

  • Arizona state employees were told to work remotely Thursday, and despite peaceful protests so far, fences have been erected at the capitol building.
  • New Mexico's state capitol was closed to the public Thursday, Axios' Russell Contreras reports.
  • Minnesota and Maryland Statehouses are among many beefing up security, according to state officials.
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Between the lines: For some states, increased security measures are not new given the pandemic and ongoing unrest over police killings and coronavirus-related orders in the past year.

  • The state capitol in St. Paul, Minnesota, for example, has been fenced off since last May, and work at the capitol has already been largely remote, according to Axios Minneapolis reporter Torey Van Oot.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 8: The siege

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 8: The siege. An inside account of the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 that ultimately failed to block the certification of the Electoral College. And, finally, Trump's concession.

On Jan. 6, White House deputy national security adviser Matt Pottinger entered the West Wing in the mid-afternoon, shortly after his colleagues' phones had lit up with an emergency curfew alert from D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser.

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

51 mins ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council Director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.