Starbucks in New York City on June 23. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

Starbucks announced Thursday that it will require customers to wear face coverings in all company-owned stores across the U.S. starting July 15.

The big picture: "...many retail workers have reluctantly turned into de facto enforcers of public health guidelines, confronting customers who refuse to wear masks or to maintain a wide distance from others," the New York Times reported in May.

Between the lines: Starbucks did not specify in its Thursday release how the new rule on face coverings would be enforced.

What they're saying: Customers who visit stores without face coverings — in areas without a "local government mandate" — can order at the drive-thru, use curbside pickup or place delivery orders, the company said.

Go deeper: Starbucks enters “monitor and adapt” phase of coronavirus response

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 18,288,573 — Total deaths: 693,805 — Total recoveries — 10,916,907Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 4,713,562 — Total deaths: 155,469 — Total recoveries: 1,513,446 — Total tests: 57,543,852Map.
  3. Education — Fauci: Schools can reopen with safeguards, but those in virus hot spots should remain closed
  4. Politics: White House will require staff to undergo randomized coronavirus testing — Pelosi says Birx "enabled" Trump on misinformation.
  5. Sports: 13 members of St. Louis Cardinals test positive, prompting MLB to cancel Tigers series — Former FDA chief says MLB outbreaks should be warning sign for schools.
  6. 1 🎥 thing: "Tenet" may be the first major film to get a global pandemic release.

Google to keep workers at home through July 2021

Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Photo: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Google will keep its employees out of its offices and working from home through at least next July, the tech giant confirmed on Monday.

Why it matters: It's the first major U.S. company to allow remote work for such an extended period in response to the coronavirus pandemic. The Wall Street Journal first reported on the extension.

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

While several novel coronavirus vaccines are in late-stage trials, World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned on Monday: "There is no silver bullet at the moment, and there might never be."

What he's saying: "For now, stopping outbreaks comes down the the basis of public health and disease control," Tedros said. Testing, isolating and treating patients and tracing and quarantining their contacts."