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Fans during Sunday's Steelers-Browns game in Pittsburgh. Photo: Joe Sargent/Getty Images

Following the No Sports Era this spring, we transitioned to the No Fans Era, with bubble tournaments and empty stadiums becoming a staple of the summer.

The state of play: We have now entered the Limited Fans Era, a transition that has gone somewhat unnoticed due to shifting attendance policies.

The latest: Look no further than this weekend, when many of the biggest sporting events in the U.S. had fans in the stands.

  • NFL: Eight of Sunday's 11 games had fans (Charlotte, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Nashville, Miami and Tampa Bay). Tonight's Cardinals-Cowboys game in Dallas will make it nine this week.
  • MLB: 10,920 fans were on hand at Globe Life Field for Game 7 of the NLCS. Roughly the same number will be in attendance throughout the World Series.
  • College football: Over 19,000 fans watched Alabama beat Georgia at Bryant-Denny Stadium, 18,000 watched Florida State upset UNC at home, 11,000 attended Clemson-Georgia Tech. The list goes on.
  • Boxing: Fans haven't been allowed at a noteworthy boxing event in the U.S. since Top Rank started staging fights again on June 9 inside its Vegas bubble. But on Saturday, 250 fans were permitted to attend the Lomachenko-Lopez fight at the same MGM Grand venue.

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Nov 13, 2020 - Economy & Business

Niche sports reporting finds a home

Numerous journalists, from sports writers to tech reporters, have recently launched their own, independent publications, mostly via email newsletters.

Why it matters: The rise of independent journalism has breathed new life into niche content, with tools like Substack helping subject matter experts carve out their own corner of the internet.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.